Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
32
4.3 out of 5 stars
Enter the Saint
Format: Mass Market Paperback|Change


on 18 May 2017
Absorbing read that has stood the test of time-the Saint remains mysterious yet cultured and charismatic-hard to see beyond the perfect casting of Roger Moore !...Will encourage me to reread more of this great series
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 April 2017
Perhaps the TV series with Roger Moore spoilt my enjoyment of the Saint books, but I found the written version not to my liking at all. The TV series was good fun thanks to the personality of Moore. The books are hard work.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 19 June 2017
A very good read
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 July 2017
Good read
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 April 2017
An oldie but goodie, breat fun.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 July 2002
I read a Pocket Book Edition, and it contains three stories; "The Man Who Was Clever", "The Policeman With Wings", "The Lawless Lady".
This book is written after "The Last Hero", but it describes the Saint's adventures before "The Last Hero", how he makes his debut as a "Modern Robin Hood". In the foreword, Charteris states that this is the answer to the many people's question how the Saint gains the reputation that he already has in "The Last Hero".
The stories are rather simple and not so unique as later stories such as "The Saint and Mr. Teal". But I like them. Few dull parts and highly enjoyable. I particularly love the Saint of this era; youthful, gay and lively. And I also like his amiable and capable sidekick Roger Conway. It's a pity that he doesn't appear on later stories.
11 Comment| 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 February 2002
(The second of the Saint books, where Simon Templar really began to hit his stride. Charteris in later years didn't care for the first book, Meet the Tiger! very much.)
Consists of 2 novellas, "The Man Who Was Clever" and "The Lawless Lady". If you have The Saint: Five Complete Novels, then you already have this book as part of that one.
In "The Man Who Was Clever", the Saint takes on Edgar Hayn, a drug dealer who runs some undercover gambling operations in London. "The Lawless Lady" is more the story of Dicky Tremayne, one of the Saint's friends and another wearer of the halo, and his pursuit of Audrey Perowne.
Covers the first appearance of Inspector Teal, and the poor man's initial encounters with the Saint, when the Saint was first beginning to make his signature stick-figure drawings the terror of evildoers. In those days, the Saint operated with a team of four other Saints, and made a point of donating 10% of the take from every operation to charity (which helped rub the salt into Teal's wounds by underlining that the Saint had got away with it yet again...)
11 Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
VINE VOICEon 16 May 2015
Book one in the series is "The Saint Meets the Tiger" which was his third novel introduces the character the Saint. This is book two in the series.

Simon Templar is known as the Saint. By the time you buy this book you know his M. O. (Modus operandi) or "method of operation." However for me, my introduction came from the short stories "Featuring the Saint."

At first this reads like it is going to be a bunch of short stories until he ties it all together as he takes on the Snake who is working for a larger scale operation. He de-scaled the Snake without getting his hair mussed; then he takes on the larger drug-smuggling problem.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 December 2014
ok
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 13 June 2013
Meet the Tiger (later retitled "The Saint meets the Tiger"), published in 1928, was Leslie Charteris's first book in the Saint Saga (even though Hodder & Stoughton later pretended that "Enter the Saint" was, presumably because they weren't the publishers of the former).

Nevertheless, "Enter the Saint" is the book that introduces Simon Templar as he is in most of the books that follow, and as neither the cinema nor television has yet had the nerve to portray him: he beats people up, robs them, blackmails them, even murders them, and gets away with it. And the fact that his victims are particularly vicious thugs (Snake Ganning), dope dealers (Edgar Hayn), white slavers, war profiteers and so forth — and that he gives a large chunk of his profits to charity — would not excuse him to a strict moralist. The success of the Saint books for seventy years must mean that strict moralists are perhaps not as common as one ought to hope.

There are three longish stories; a reference that may be presumed to be to Sir John Bittle (from "Meet The Tiger") dates the first at nine months after the end of that opus.

To enumerate plot details would probably be superfluous. Suffice it to say that Charteris was just starting to hit his stride, and that "Enter" introduces two of his best characters: the Saint's friend Roger Conway, and his perpetual adversary, Inspector Claud Eustace Teal. Patricia Holm now lives with the Saint although (daringly for 1930) they aren't married, and Orace is still the stalwart retainer.

A fine warm up to its sequel, what is possibly the best of all the Saint stories: The Last Hero (aka The Saint Closes the Case).

N.B. Contrary to the assertion on this page, this is 2nd Saint book, not the 3rd.

P.S. For a list of all Charteris's Saint books (in two sections, because of length limitations) see my Listmanias.
22 Comments| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)