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Battle of Waterloo

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"A Truly great Buy." - by Mr. Michael J. Bushell (UK)
A great account of the lead up to & the Battle of Waterloo. A really fantastic fact told through the input from Peter & Dan Snow many additions enclosed within the book in the respect of copies of actual letters of the time plus pull out maps etc., A great Buy for any History buff.

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"Well worth the read" - by chris laxton
I have read many non-fiction historical books, but not one on Waterloo and hence I am no expert and in no position to comment on the historical accuracy of this book. However, I found the book a ripping good read and it has made me want to read more on the battle and individuals involved, which cannot be a bad thing.

From reading the reviews, it would seem if you're an expert on Waterloo avoid this book, if you're not and want an intro to the battle(s), I thoroughly recommend it.

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"Waterloo Battlefield Guide. David Buttery" - by C. J. N. Viner (Engand)
At last, at long, long last a REAL Battlefield of Waterloo Guide! A book that combines superb maps and photographs, plus sketch and line drawings, with a flowing and accurate account of not just the most famous battle of them all, Waterloo, but the campaign that culminated in it. However this wonderful publication is so much more than just a 'guide'. The author begins with a concise account of the rise and fall of Napoleon, his return from first exile and reclamation of the throne of France, then moves effortlessly into the battles of Ligny, Quatre Bras and finally Wavre. Each of these are of extreme importance if one is to fully understand the fight which took place on the 18th June and David Butterly explains them with well researched accuracy. In fact those are two words which sum up this publication, Well Researched!
The Guide describes Waterloo, not simply ... full review

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"A Place of Skulls." - by Dr Barry Clayton (United Kingdom)
'The Crowning Carnage' (Byron); 'that world earthquake, Waterloo!' (Tennyson).

This short book by Cambridge historian Brendan Simms deals with the defence of the farmhouse at La Haye Sainte during the battle of Waterloo. Books on this battle have recently been published that cover: the final four days, the 24 hours on the final day, and now this one that focuses minute by minute on the defence of the La Haye Sainte farmhouse on the afternoon of the 18th June 1815.

The author's recent work :'Europe: The Struggle for Supremacy' is a superb account of the period 1453 to the present. This book is on a much smaller scale altogether. Among his key points are: the importance of the battle for the whole of Europe, and the importance of the use of a 'united nations' force to overcome Napoleon. In 1945, Churchill used this in a conversation with ... full review

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"the fifteen decisive battles of the world" - by Music Lover
the best book i have read all year.
an enthralling account of famous battles written in a very readable style.

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"FIRST HAND ACCOUNT" - by The Village Bike (England)
Very good read. Written by the men that actually took part at the time and not some 21st century view point. The descriptions of the battle are grim but reading the various accounts from different people is fascinating using the Georgian precise way of describing events.

After visiting the battle site last year and understanding the size of the battle field, reading this book makes what happened there more real.

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"A very interesting perspective" - by jimmac
I already possess many books about Waterloo and indeed The Duke Of Wellington generally but this is a very interesting view of this battle from the French perspective which goes into considerable detail regarding the many reasons for the French decisions that day.

If one overlooks some naturally prejudicial views of some of the French participents and one or two questionable views of the author (e.g. penetration of the South gate at Hougoumont and reference to the garden to the West (East?) p.263), this book is a serious, detailed analysis of how the French contrived to lose, the stoicism of the allied defence and the vital influence of the Prussian intervention. Certainly, to have the opportunity to read an account of this battle 'from the other side' is a very welcome addition to the multitudes of books already printed on the subject and one which I found totally ... full review

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"The sting in the tale" - by Michael Howard
At this range before the twelve nights of Christmas which will see in the Waterloo Bicentenary year, do we want, do we need another history, even a product of eight years of the most determined and profound research, if it were to be just a rearrangement of the well-worn furniture? Well, if we are content to live with the myth, the Wellington myth, perhaps. But if we are ready to see the myth for what it is, then this is a hugely important rewrite of the story of Waterloo, with its now precise chronology telling a story with a quite different and quite shocking dénouement, particularly during the 'hidden last half hour'..
The deed which converted what had threatened to remain a bloody but undecided encounter into a terminal defeat for Napoleon, was a brilliant stroke by one of Wellington's subordinate commanders, Colborne of the 52nd, ... full review

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"Perfect" - by David Waterfall
Im a massive history buff so really enjoyed this book into how real battles happened as an ex soldier i can really appreciate the battles and the author although dated is spot on to reliving those ancient wars perfect!

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"The narrative of the two days of battle at the heart of the book is brilliant" - by Mark Pack (London, UK)
The impending 200th anniversary of the battle of Waterloo has seen a mini-burst of books coming out, of which Tim Clayton's has been one of the best in reviews so far. It certainly deserves those reviews and comes with the triple bonus of a good set of illustrations, maps that are (all too rarely for history books) pitched at the right level of detail to be useful without being confusing, and enough references to allow the reader to follow up any aspects of the story that really catches their attention.

Despite the subtitle, "Four days that changed Europe's destiny" the book gives only relatively brief attention to the wider context of the battle, and in doing so assumes that it was necessarily important - as opposed to the counter-argument that given the relative strengths of France and the alliance Napoleon faced, he was bound to lose the campaign of ... full review

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"A Decent Look at Waterloo" - by Aussie Reader (Canberra, Australia)
I have just finished reading my third book recently published on the Battle of Waterloo. This one was by Robert Kershaw, titled; “24 Hours at Waterloo”. The previous books were by Gordon Corrigan and Bernard Cornwell and each have been different in their approach in telling the story of this famous battle.

Robert Kershaw’s approach has been to tell the story by the use of first-hand accounts, his aim was to give a human and personal dimension to the battle and in this he succeeds admirably. This is a well told account of Waterloo, mainly narrated through the experiences of the officers and soldiers involved in the fighting. We hear from French, British, Prussian and the other allied nationals who made up 2/3rds of Wellington’s forces on the ridge.

The author’s use of these personal accounts are well placed within the narrative and never detracted from the story, ... full review