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saturday night fever LP

4.7 out of 5 stars 165 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: RSO
  • ASIN: B003YXVK4U
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (165 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Marty From SF HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Sept. 2007
Format: Audio CD
"SNF" sold over 35 million copies world-wide. It also garnered seven #1 hits in the USA alone. The Bee Gees also won several Grammys from this for production and vocal arrangement. A unique mix of disco, funk and orchestration, this album (now one CD and newly remastered to perfection) defined a generation and a lasting style of music (albeit with repercussions). If you are still stalling on buying this, consider that it has been remixed and if you ever want to listen to dance songs that actually contain interesting lyrics; this is the one.
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By Peter Durward Harris #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 16 April 2005
Format: Audio CD
Soundtrack albums have always been something of a problem - either they stick closely to the movie (as they originally did), presenting a lot of music that makes no sense outside the context of the movie, or (as generally happens now) they gather together a collection of music that has little connection with the movie, except that bits of each song can be heard in the background of the movie. Occasionally, an old style soundtrack (such as West Side Story) had enough great music to sell in huge quantities, but such soundtracks were the exception. The Saturday night fever soundtrack marked the beginning of the shift to a more popular form of soundtrack album, although there are some weak tracks here.
The Bee Gees wrote most of the music for this album and recorded some of it themselves. They gave More than a woman to Tavares although their own version of the song also appears on the album. They gave If I can't have you to Yvonne Elliman although they had already released their own version of the song as the B-side to one of their hits. They also included a couple of their own oldies (Jive talking, You should be dancing) on the soundtrack, but the most important tracks here are the first three tracks - Staying alive, How deep in your love and Night fever - all of which were huge hits around the world although they were bigger hits in America than anywhere else. Of the other tracks, Boogie shoes (KC and the sunshine band), Disco inferno (Trammps) and Open sesame (Kool and the gang) are the best.
Those classic tracks can, of course, be found elsewhere. You would that an appearance on a successful album like this would make stars of the contributors that weren't already stars, but David Shire (for example) disappeared as quickly as he came.
If you only want the best songs, you may prefer to buy them by the individual artists, beginning with a Bee Gees compilation (there are plenty to choose from) but despite some weak tracks, this album is the soundtrack of an era.
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By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 8 Oct. 2002
Format: Audio CD
This masterpiece has lost none of its appeal after 25 years, proving the critics wrong and the BeeGees right. Part of its popularity must be due to the clever mix of fast dance numbers and lovely soaring ballads. The frenetic pace of e.g. Staying Alive and Night Fever is balanced by the serene pace of How Deep Is Your Love. For fans of the old-style BeeGees ballads, this new direction with the edgy falsetto vocals and the nervous beat came as a shock initially, but those hits like Jive Talkin' and You Should Be Dancing soon enough swept one up in the disco fever. I love Yvonne Elliman's poignant ballad If I Can't Have You, while the tracks by Kool & The Gang, MFSB and KC & The Sunshine Band are great too. But the real underground classic here is Disco Inferno by Trammps, nine minutes of burbling, bubbling, stomping, storming, gripping funk that is as anthemic as any great rock song by for example Bruce Springsteen. Come to think of it, most of the BeeGees tracks here can also be considered as anthems of the disco generation. Besides serving as bridges between the classic hits, the filler tracks like A Fifth Of Beethoven and Salsation add authenticity to the overall listening experience and serve to strengthen the ambience. This album and the movie took disco out of the underground and reinvented it as a mainstream phenomenon. While rock music was going through the convulsions of the punk and new wave revolutions, disco was having the party of the decade. And this album, along with the music of Donna Summer, Grace Jones, Chic, Giorgio Moroder, Boney M, Village People and others, provided the soundtrack to an era.
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By Peter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 24 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
This masterpiece has lost none of its appeal after all these years, proving the critics wrong and the BeeGees right. Part of its popularity must be due to the clever mix of fast dance numbers and lovely soaring ballads. The frenetic pace of e.g. Staying Alive and Night Fever is balanced by the serene pace of How Deep Is Your Love.

For fans of the old-style BeeGees ballads, this new direction with the edgy falsetto vocals and the nervous beat came as a shock initially, but those hits like Jive Talkin' and You Should Be Dancing soon enough swept one up in the disco fever. I love Yvonne Elliman's poignant ballad If I Can't Have You, while the tracks by Kool & The Gang, MFSB and KC & The Sunshine Band are great too.

But the real underground classic here is Disco Inferno by Trammps, nine minutes of burbling, bubbling, stomping, storming, gripping funk that is as anthemic as any great rock song by for example Bruce Springsteen. Come to think of it, most of the BeeGees tracks here can also be considered as anthems of the disco generation.

Besides serving as bridges between the classic hits, the filler tracks like A Fifth Of Beethoven and Salsation add authenticity to the overall listening experience and serve to strengthen the ambience. This album and the movie took disco out of the underground and reinvented it as a mainstream phenomenon.

While rock music was going through the convulsions of the punk and new wave revolutions, disco was having the party of the decade. And this album, along with the music of Donna Summer, Grace Jones, Chic, Giorgio Moroder, Boney M, Village People and others, provided the soundtrack to an era.
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