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Customer Review

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bit of an annoyance, 24 Jan. 2012
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This review is from: The Secret Art of Self-Development: 16 little-known rules for eternal happiness & freedom (Kindle Edition)
I decided to purchase this Kindle book after reading Karl's other book 'The 18 Rules of Happiness' (which I was impressed with). Karl advertises this book in that one.

I was disappointed to find that the content is very, very similar to the previous book.
A lot is repeated word for word in fact.
When you click on 'Look inside' on Amazon, you can't see the table of contents.

Oddly, the table of contents is put at the end of the book.
It makes me wonder if Karl did this deliberately so people wouldn't know the book was pretty much identical to his other/cheaper book.

Karl definitely seems to enjoy putting sentences in bold, and tends to use a lot of spacing throughout.
Whether this is to kill a few pages, I don't know.

If you haven't read the other book, this is worth 4 stars, but for me I feel like this was a waste of time.
I actually preferred 18 rules.
Both books are, however, well-written.
They contain good advice (though nothing new) compiled into a motivating read.

3 STARS.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 1 Mar 2012, 00:37:59 GMT
User says:
The title of the first chapter of both books is certainly the same: "Stop Feeling Sorry for Yourself." This is highlighted within the books, and elsewhere in interviews with Karl.

This is purposeful, designed to highlight one of the core issues holding us back. After that, the books are very different: one discusses happiness and our hidden journey toward it, the other talks about self-development and the quest to understand ourselves and the world around us. The writing style is simple and easy-to-understand, common sense and breezy. But there is also a certain depth to it that many reviewers here have picked up, and is obviously appreciated.

The book has been listed as free for a couple of days this month, so expect a few more interesting reviews.

Posted on 5 Mar 2012, 08:52:42 GMT
Ed says:
useful review thanks
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