Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Fitbit
Customer Review

32 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A geat read!, 27 Dec. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How We Invented Freedom & Why It Matters (Hardcover)
I have always been interested in British history, but struggled to fit it into a consistent narrative. This book supplies a convincing, as well as an uplifting one. I would even suggest that something along the lines of this book's thesis could usefully be incorporated into school history curricula.

One of the principal ideas in this book is that the liberty inherent in the political system of the anglosphere nations owes a great deal to our systems of common law. This idea is understood by few of us, and probably far fewer, if any, people of other cultures. If this book helps more people recognise our magnificent common law heritage, then it will have done a great service to us all. I recommend Hayek's "Law, Legislation and Liberty" on this subject.

I recommend this book to all those English people who feel vaguely embarrassed entertaining patriotic thoughts.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 5 Jan 2014, 14:04:41 GMT
I think it is the other way round. Common law developed in the Anglo-Saxon world because liberty was important. So, liberty, or a desire for liberty, came first and Common Law came second. Common law could not have arisen in authoritarian countries, such as Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Norway, Sweden....... because in these countries people have a need for authority in their personal lives.

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Jun 2016, 02:24:46 BST
It is a mistake to view the German speaking world as a monolith. Until Bismarck unified Germany under Prussia it was a patchwork of states with vibrant experimental cultures. Don't forget that our current dynansty constitutional monarchs originated in Hanover.

Even Prussia was developing a strong liberal movement, which appalled Bismarck. Unfortunately for the history of liberalism, Bismarck was a political genius. He killed Prussian liberalism by inventing the modern welfare state. It extended the bonds of patronage and state dependency to the lowest levels of society, while creating and intellectual class beholden to the state. I suspect the the world wars of the 20th century would not have been possible but for the psychology of obedience to the state so created.

Even worse, the success of Bismarck's scheme in "justifying" big statism caused politicians worldwide to infect their countries with it.

Unraveling the unsustainable welfare state model peaceably will be as costly as was the abolition of slavery in the British Empire in 1833. That was, however, far less costly than the violence of civil war.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›