Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Customer Review

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Harris and O'Toole Weren't British..., 17 Dec. 2013
This review is from: Don't Let the Bastards Grind You Down: How One Generation of British Actors Changed the World (Paperback)
It always troubles me when books like this, which look to celebrate a certain aspect of a nation's culture, resort to shoe-horning in factually inaccurate subject matter just to pad out the word count. The whole world and its dog knows O'Toole and Harris were Irish so why the pretence that they are part of this celebrated group of British actors? For sure, O'Toole and Harris would have worked alongside Britain's finest and, for sure, both actors would have learnt some of their craft alongside Britain's finest too BUT the two Irishmen also went to America and got their hands dirty with America's finest. The two Irishmen travelled the world and worked alongside a whole host of international stars.

O'Toole and Harris were very proud of being Irish and if the Americans, the British, the French or whoever tried to claim them they would have politely pointed out that they were citizens of the world and IRISH.

In short, a message to British social and cultural commentators: please stop claiming other nations' jewels as your own.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-5 of 5 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 20 Mar 2014 13:53:57 GMT
Tempestas says:
I thought "Great Britain" included Ireland, thus making the inhabitants of Ireland both British AND Irish........whether the Irish like it or not.

In reply to an earlier post on 8 Apr 2014 10:54:43 BDT
cora says:
British, when used as a geographical term, includes Ireland, since it's one of the British Isles. Great Britain, however, denotes the bigger of the two islands, which includes England, Scotland and Wales, and most emphatically not Ireland (hence "The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland"). This only as information, not meant to offend.

Apart from that, I think the most sensible approach is to see British here as a geographical term including both the British Isles and smaller islands and enjoy the book.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Aug 2014 15:13:19 BDT
I hope you never come to Ireland and repeat what you've just said here!....Even the most laid back of Irishmen would take offence at being called British after finally ejecting the said British from most of Ireland after a struggle lasting eight hundred years and the loss of tens of thousands of people on both sides.

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Nov 2014 12:04:35 GMT
[Deleted by the author on 29 Nov 2014 13:16:07 GMT]

In reply to an earlier post on 29 Nov 2014 12:29:26 GMT
Donegal says:
The term "British Isles" is the name the British have given to the archipelago of islands that the Irish and British inhabit - this is not the name that the Irish government, for example, uses for the archipelago. The larger island, "Great Britain" is so called to distinguish it, historically, from "Little Britain" (now known as "Brittany") in northern France. There is no collective term for the peoples who inhabit the archipelago. The term "British" denotes citizens of Britain and the UK. Calling people from Ireland "British" is as ridiculous and erroneous as calling people from Britain/UK "Irish". To put it another way, calling Harris and O'Toole "Britons" would be akin to calling French people "Germans" or Danish people "Norwegians"...or, indeed, United States citizens, "Mexicans".

The most sensible approach, when writing books such as this, is to stick to the boundaries of the project. If I wrote a book on great American rock bands and included chapters on The Beatles and The Rolling Stones I would - quite rightly - expect flak from British rock fans. If an American commentator than made the point that, for the benefit of the book, Britons should simply (and sensibly) accept the Beatles and Stones as American rock bands (after all they spent a lot of time in the US and were greatly influenced by US culture), I am sure British rock fans would raise an eyebrow.

This is a book about British actors...shoe-horning in a couple of non-Brits is a fudge and clearly casts doubt on the credibility of the project.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›