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Customer Review

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good mystery story and an enjoyable read, 17 Mar. 2009
This review is from: An Incomplete Revenge (A Maisie Dobbs Mystery) (Paperback)
Maisie Dobbs is a private investigator and psychologist in early 1930s London.

She solves mysteries by a combination of intuition and gentle probing. Shades of Miss Marple perhaps - only younger and driving an MG.

The nuances of 1930s class and speech are well observed, though sometimes the use of modern psychological ideas such as focusing or visualisation jar with the 1930s setting.

All the problems Maisie deals with have their roots in the First World War. Its aftermath and effect on combatants and non-combatants alike is a theme running through all the Maisie Dobbs novels - an original idea.

Dramatisations of the novels would make ideal Sunday night viewing. I wonder if any production company has shown interest?
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 21 Sep 2009 10:59:07 BDT
A Reader says:
It may be hard to believe, but these 'modern psychological ideas' were being researched and used in the 19th century! I suspect that 'visualisation' has been used for much longer in various cultures. The author introduces us to one of Maisie's teachers, Khan, who taught Maisie these relaxation, meditation, and visualisation techniques. I don't think Maisie was typical of the 1930's women, indeed quite an individual - but the techniques she used were available at her time........just not as familiar as they may be today! I agree that these stories would make excellent viewing, or even be great for radio.

In reply to an earlier post on 21 Jul 2011 07:39:40 BDT
I was about to say that there is nothing new under the sun and new techniques are far from new most of the time. Things just float in and out of fashion.
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