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Customer Review

5.0 out of 5 stars A great book from mr Krauss, 26 July 2014
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This review is from: A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing (Audio CD)
Mr Krauss does his best to show you that physics can explain our universe from a theory about what "nothingness" is really like. It builds a strong case for not just attributing the birth of our universe to supernatural beings and/or gods. Though not yet fully understood in detail, current theoretical physics keeps progressing and promises new and deeper insights into how it all started and how the laws of the universe govern our world. I can recommend this book to readers that like popular science books, and like not to get involved in the math and formulas that sadly prohibits easy access to the subject from other textbooks. Mr Dawkins epiloque is also worth reading - twice.

PS: I can recommend John C Taylors book "Hidden unity in natures laws" to those who would like to get a little more technical introduction to theoretical physics. I would love to read a book like that from mr Krauss. I think that the publishers wish to hide math and formulas from popular science books is a big misunderstanding. Most readers of popular science books are able to cope with high school math and are willing to try to understand even more involved stuff.
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Initial post: 29 Jul 2014, 11:22:35 BST
SteveT says:
As other reviewers have noted Krauss's " nothing", a vacuum nothing, is different from the original sense of " nothing"', as absolute non-existence, which was its sense when the question was first posited by Leibniz.

Because of this purely semantic difference Krauss is not actually answering the question, as originally stated and still commonly understood, as to why there is something rather than nothing.

His notion of "a potential for existence " merely moves the question back a step i.e why is there a potential for existence rather than nothing.

This is not to claim Krauss 's theories are wrong (or right), merely that he is answering a different question.

My take for what it is worth is on the original question...

As to the question as to why there is something rather than nothing the common sense response would be....Well, why not?

We know the universe exists, but cannot know any good reason why this should be surprising or mystifying or in need of justification. ( to say you are puzzled etc is not a good reason, it is a statement of your psychological attitude).

We have no basis to judge whether it is more " natural" for something to exist or for there to be nothing. We cannot stand outside the universe to possibly form any basis on which we can make any kind of answer to the question as to why there is something rather than nothing, we have no vantage point from which to compare the relative likelihood of different modes of existence for the universe ( in this instance something or nothing) , and a question which cannot be answered is meaningless. Somewhat akin to asking someone to explain why a cat has 5 legs.
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