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23 of 31 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars pure propaganda, 11 May 2003
This review is from: Left behind: a Novel of the Earth's Last Days (Paperback)
But to do the authors justice this book is unashamedly meant to be a vehicle for delivering their party line. If you're just looking for a good sci-fi or fantasy do yourself a favour and ignore this one. If however you are looking to be educated/indoctrinated about certain aspects of Bible Armageddon prophecy, you'll love this brand of propaganda. "Left Behind" is a fictionalized account of what some Bible theorists believe will come to pass in the end days, that all 'good' Christians will be 'raptured' - taken to heaven, and non-believers will be left behind and have to face the Anti-Christ in order to attain the salvation they missed out on first time around. Consequently the book contains a very thinly veiled "change your ways or else" message. All this ulterior motivation could be forgiven if the book had at least provided me with a good read. The subject matter of course is fascinating, but I couldn't feel anything for the characters at all. Plus the plot was just too blatantly contrived in order to deliver the authors' rather flawed message.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 20 Sep 2011 22:56:24 BDT
A. says:
Top Bible scholar Robert M. Price, writes an analysis of the left behind genre in his excellent book, "The paperback apocalypse, how the Christian church was left behind". 'The paperback apocalypse examines the theological framework of popular eschatology, comparing it with the texts to which it erroneously appeals. It goes further, demonstrating that the New Testament promise of the second coming of Jesus Christ has long since fallen victim to a self-imposed statute of limitations. That is, this pseudo event was never predicted as happening someday, in the sweet by-and-by; rather, it was always mentioned with the promise of a swift fulfillment in the readers' own day. That promise failed, and there is as much reason to postpone it, still expecting it, as there is to hold onto one's ticket from a defunct airline. It will not be honored, and it is high time to make some alternate plans. I will reinforce this point with a historical survey of disappointed eschatological expectation.'
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