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Customer Review

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Un-put-downable brilliance..., 14 Feb. 2006
This review is from: Living Next-Door to the God of Love (Hardcover)
Anyone who has read and loved ‘Natural History’ is potentially in for a real treat with this follow on. It is imaginative, intelligent, filled with lively characters, wild circumstances – and philosophical juggling which ranges from the colourful and obtuse to breathtaking lucidity. This is not as easy to read as its predecessor, not as traditional a narrative, fluent or conventional – indeed many aspects come across as highly experimental. But I found that persistence with the less clear parts of the book, particularly in the first one hundred pages, are more than rewarded when the whole begins to fall into place. Forgive me, but it becomes un-put-downable brilliance. It is not perfect, but the positives so outweigh the negatives for me that the idea of picking holes would be a petty-minded anathema; critique for the sake of hearing my own clever voice. Credit belongs where credit is due, and in short – this is an ambitious, hugely imaginative, clever, brave, brilliant and entertaining novel, which I loved, I suspect some people will hate, and ultimately I don’t care what they think – as long as Justina Robson doesn’t care as well and continues to produce work as exceptional as this for years to come.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 12 Mar 2008 14:59:26 GMT
I agree: although there is some signposting to previous novels (which I read after Living Next Door...), which help in understanding the nature of Unity & Stuffies, you have to let yourself go with this one. Having read this novel again recently, I still find Robson's turn of phrase pitch-perfect; the novel deals with the nature of reality and personality and perhaps love as a creative energy. I think this is the most coherent and enjoyable of all her novels.
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