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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply splendid, 18 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: Sense and Sensibility n/e (Oxford World's Classics) (Paperback)
As I pride myself on being an avid reader of English literature and am now close on 50, I felt it simply could not do anymore that I hadn't yet read a single novel by Jane Austen. So I recently resolved to read all of them, in the order that they were published 200 odd years ago (as I did last year with Dickens and the year before with Trollope, yes I like to think I am nothing if not methodical).

Is it any wonder I now blame myself heartily for having waited so long? 'Sense and Sensibility' is of course deservedly a classic, and, as millions before me I guess, I was captivated from page one by the story of Elinor and Marianne Dashwood, Willoughby, Edward Ferrars and Colonel Brandon.

The action may be set 200 years ago, but the story is ultimately about that inexhaustible and timeless topic: love and love's tribulations, and as such it is most probably as captivating today as it was in 1811 when it was first published. I found this splendid story to be a real page-turner, very 'easy-to-read' with a limited cast of characters (but what characters!) and an incomparably fluent style and yet, at the same time, there's ever so much to reflect upon that I wonder not that many, of whom I will become one I hazard, keep on re-reading these novels. But first I am eager to discover what joys Pride and Prejudice (Oxford World's Classics) will bring!
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Initial post: 7 Jun 2017, 21:22:18 BST
Hello Didier: if you do keep re-reading these novels, may I suggest that you do so next time in the order in which they were probably written, namely: Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice (all conceived in Jane Austen's teens and subsequently revised), then Mansfield Park, Emma and Persuasion, all works of her thirties when she and her mother and sister had finally settled at Chawton in 1809. There emerges a clear picture of a daguerreotype Austen novel, each version of which is a reworking and an improvement.
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