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Customer Review

14 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Timely topic but too much jargon, 21 May 2013
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This review is from: Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea (Hardcover)
This is a book by a British economist lecturing at a university in the US who opposes current Western government austerity policies root and branch. It is published in the US but actually contains more material of interest to the European than to the American reader. In particular, its damning verdict on the euro is worth studying, because it comes from an author who remains convinced of the value of the European project in political terms.
In its racy, almost colloquial style, the book appears to be pitched at the general reader: it is very readable--but it is so peppered with jargon that is not always explained, that understanding, as opposed to reading, is rather more difficult. Krugman, a Nobel laureate in economics, demonstrates in his books on similar subjects that the use of a great deal of jargon is not necessary.
What is more, if you are going to try to impress with jargon like Soziale Marktwirtschaft and Wirtschaftswunder (describing the postwar German economy), then make sure that either you or your proofreader can spell these terms!
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 6 Sep 2013, 17:00:55 BST
edward says:
[Customers don't think this post adds to the discussion. Show post anyway. Show all unhelpful posts.]

Posted on 20 Mar 2015, 10:48:36 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Mar 2015, 10:50:48 GMT
Muse says:
Thank you for the info.
The truth can be said simply, so, with a command of what Englanders call the best of languages, the author should have been able to make himself, meaning the subject matter, better understood. The author sounds like a pompous pratt.

I reviewed a book called "GIS: A short introduction", and I am sure (not to contradict your review) the book you reviewed could be no worse than that one. My review read:"The author is very knowledgeable on the subject matter and gives a good description and historical perspective on both GISystems and GIScience (which both have the same acronym) in relation to Geography and Cartography. Besides not always being grammatically correct, the discourse is laced with highfalutin words (such as segue, inchoate, appellation, explicate, quotidian, etc, etc) on every page. One of her sentences epitomises her obfuscating style of writing: "A demand for scientific objectivity underlies the political and legal basis of our society" (Really? A demand underlying a basis for a society?). This forces even the most well read layman to spend an inordinate amount of time deciphering the meaning of sentences with the use of a large dictionary. She seems to enjoy sounding smart and, moreover, she seems to have written the book for a cabal of intellectual feminists, for at the beginning she advises of her intent to prove the relevance of GIS to feminism (- she attempts the exposé in the last chapter). I would have given it a much better rating had she not tried to hijack the concepts of GIS for ulterior motives in such a tiresome fashion."

Could this book on austerity be any worse than that one? :-)

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jul 2015, 22:41:50 BST
What the heck is this comment even about?

In reply to an earlier post on 25 Aug 2015, 21:30:04 BST
Last edited by the author on 25 Aug 2015, 21:30:38 BST
D. V. S. - FYI, Mark Blyth isn't a pompous pratt. Watch him on Youtube if you doubt this statement.
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