Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Fitbit
Customer Review

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Spiritual Compass, 2 July 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Spiritual Compass: The Three Qualities of Life (Hardcover)
Satish Kumar's book describes the three states of mind that we may find ourselves embracing. Sattva for creativity, Rajas for energy and Tamas for inertia which are also known as the three "gunas". The first is good and the other two not so good and so we should all try to become "sattvic".

The book contains some nice ideas but is very unrealistic, even in rural India I doubt if it would be possible to go out into the countryside, build a house and start growing vegetables. In Britain it would certainly get you noticed by the authorities so I am not sure who the book is aimed at.

There are numerous references to Ghandi quoting some of his ideas and also some other famous people in ancient India such as King Janaka who did not own his Kingdom but was owned by it, a bit like our own Queen really.

The book deals mainly on how society should operate, how multinationals should conduct their affairs etc. I doubt if they will find the time to read the book so it is all rather academic.

Satish Kumar explains how we are ruining the planet with our modern way of life pointing to the simple Indian way of life as the answer. I have never been to India but I understand that there is considerable industrialisation taking place and that the population of India will surpass China in a few years. Mr Kumar does not address this problem nor which of the three "gunas" is responsible.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 11 Apr 2016, 10:09:14 BST
Vinit Shah says:
> even in rural India I doubt if it would be possible to go out into the countryside, build a house and start growing vegetables.
A major percentage of Indian population is farmers, who grow vegetables in their own countryside, so it is very much possible. However, these are the people most affected by rapid industrialization and global warming. There are lot of farmer suicides taking place in India due to this. But this way of living is definitely not extinct yet! You can check this video (http://www.satyamevjayate.in/watch-the-episodes/toxic-food/watch-full-episode.aspx) if you want a more detailed look. There are places in India where organic farming is taken up by the larger community as a whole.

However, you are right when you say that India is getting industrialized. This has affected our way of living. There is a huge contrast in today's India and the Indian way of living and Mr. Satish himself is not well known in India.

That said, this is neither a book nor a philosophy that can/is supposed to bring over night change. As the title suggests, it is simply a compass. A compass without a boat and favorable weather is obviously useless.

Let's hope that Nature can last the torture that we are carrying out and that the human mind can survive.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

Reviewer


Location: Surbiton

Top Reviewer Ranking: 2,896,803