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Customer Review

17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Ook!, 13 April 2013
This review is from: The Science of Discworld IV: Judgement Day (The Science of Discworld Series Book 4) (Kindle Edition)
Oh dear... I have read, and loved, all the Pratchett books ever since I first picked up a cheap copy of Strata many years ago. He has been my favourite author all that time. I'll probably continue buying them for ever, in the possibly vain hope that there'll be a return to form. This however is a further sign that that form is irrevocably lost. The essence of the fictional sections of this book is merely a longish short story, interspersed with Ian Stewart and Jack Cohen's factual scientifically based sections. But unlike previous Science of Discworld books, I found myself more eager to read the science chapters than the fiction.

Pratchett, whom I have always admired for his use of language, seems no longer capable of constructing a sentence without overcomplicating and over-elaborating it. The narrativium seems to have deserted him too; the story itself is childishly simple, without any depth at all.

The dialogue, which used to zing, is cumbersome and stilted; there seems to be no differentiation between characters' speech patterns. They all talk ponderously and awkwardly, with way too many clauses and sub-clauses.

It was quite a shock to realise that Stewart and Cohen were able to write more wittily and entertainingly than Pratchett in this book. The book was worth buying for their contribution, not, sadly for his...
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 11 Nov 2013 16:37:30 GMT
grev001 says:
"try proving, SCIENTIFICALLY, that one and one make two."
Yes, that's difficult. Read Principia Mathematica by Whitehead and Russell. Good Luck!
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