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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit too much like a play, 18 May 2008
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This review is from: In Which We Serve (Special Edition) [DVD] [1942] (DVD)
There is a movie quite like this one, made later and a lot better, I recommend the Cruel Sea.

In Which We Serve is worth viewing, it is a propaganda movie from WW2 for a nation unsure of its future and in 1942 thisgs did look bleak for England and the Commonwealth.

The movie isn't bad at all but feels more like a play than a movie. It uses some footage but otherwise you feel like you are watcing a stage with a certain extent of overacting and stiff dialog.

The Cruel Sea was made after WW2 and is a better movie in all respects, both are B/W but the Cruel Sea covers a larger time frame and covers the rather inglorious but very important convoy duties. The characters are more believable as is their situation. Otherwise the 2 are remarkably similar.

In Which We Serve is well worth a watch but it is too much a propaganda movie and feels too much like a play to merit much more than 3 stars.
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 20 Feb 2009, 15:49:00 GMT
J. E. Holmes says:
It was actually based on Mountbatten's experience as a ship's captain. The comparison with Monserratt is meaningless, a work of fiction about the futility of war.

Posted on 22 Feb 2009, 02:32:11 GMT
Interesting. But I daresay Noel Coward added a dash of fiction which it feels like a play even if based on experience. I still stand with the Cruel Sea being the superior movie but I thank you for your valuable input.

Posted on 19 Aug 2009, 01:36:31 BST
Taken from Wikipedia;
"Though a pacifist, Monsarrat served in World War II, first as a member of an ambulance brigade and then as a member of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. His lifelong love of sailing made him a capable naval officer, and he served with distinction in a series of small warships assigned to escort convoys and protect them from enemy attack. Monsarrat ended the war as commander of a frigate, and drew on his wartime experience in his postwar sea stories.

The Cruel Sea (1951), Monsarrat's first postwar novel, is widely regarded as his finest work, and is the only one of his novels that is still widely read. Based on his own wartime service, it followed the young naval officer Keith Lockhart through a series of postings in corvettes and frigates. It was one of the first novels to depict life aboard the vital, but unglamorous, "small ships" of World War II-ships for which the sea was as much a threat as the Germans."

Not a bad qualification for writing a novel about the North Atlantic Sea in WW2 and a tad bit far from a "meaningless, a work of fiction" - wouldn't you say?
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