Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Fitbit
Customer Review

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books on the campaign, 20 Dec. 2012
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Decision in Normandy: The Real Story of Montgomery and the Allied Campaign (Paperback)
An excellent book on the Normandy Campaign. The old US vs Brits/Canadians argument will probably never go away - judging by the tone of some other comments here. D'Este's point is not so much against the performance of individual British or Canadian units - who as others rightly note - did have the majority of elite SS and Panzer divisions ranged against them - but more Montgomery's handling of his part of the battle at the time - and his subsequent re-writing of history afterwards.

For all its undoubted bravery and dogged determination, the Anglo-Canadian 21st Army group was not as good in the exploitation phase of the battle as the US armies. This is not being anti-British or revisionist, but merely a recognition that for all their faults - US commanders were able to better integrate and utilise their troops and resources.

Montgomery would have been better served by being more honest in the run-up to D-Day - promising to take Caen so soon was hopelessly optimistic - and should have been more honest in his dealings with Ike and Brad during the campaign. But I also agree that he was acutely aware that he had the only British army there was - and it was going to get smaller - as Britain was running short of avaialble manpower - something US commanders did not have to worry about.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail
Tracked by 1 customer

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 9 Feb 2015, 21:27:27 GMT
Can I suggest that a new assessment of the Normandy Campaign is well worth reading, by a British military historian (John Buckley) that is not uncritical but is a necessary first-step in reassessing Montgomery as military commander and is purchasable on Amazon (Title:"Monty's Men"). Another important study is Richard Lamb's "Montgomery in Europe" (which can also be obtained through Amazon) and again is both objective and critical. But, what comes out of both these works is that Montgomery was the master of the set piece battle something that Patton for all his brilliant opportunism could never have achieved.

Reference has been made to the amount of forces confronting the Anglo-Canadians as compared to those on the American sector, and it is instructive to set them out: 5th July, British sector = 590 Panzers + 64 infantry battalions. The American sector = 215 + 63. 10th July British = 610+ 92 American = 190 + 85. Some quotes: "On July 25th the U.S. First Army launched a fresh offensive, 'Cobra', while the recently landed Patton's Third Army was ready to follow it up. The last German reserves had been thrown in to stop the British" (Basil Liddell-Hart "A History of the Second World War" p522) "Certainly if even a single Panzer division had been put in reserve, the American break-out at St. Lo (25th July-4th August) would have been far more difficult" (Richard Lamb "Montgomery in Europe p134). This, of course, was Montgomery's plan, to draw in the bulk of the German forces onto his 21st Army Group allowing Bradley to develop his plan for a break-out, which was done brilliantly.

The bottom-line is that the success in Western Europe was down to the leadership and fighting qualities of all the Allied troops, not just one particular army.

In reply to an earlier post on 10 Feb 2015, 11:25:09 GMT
Tim62 says:
Hi GO

Thank you. I do have Buckley's book on my pile of ready-to-read books. I know I really should get round to it, but thank you again for the recommend!

best Tim
‹ Previous 1 Next ›