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Customer Review

57 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Baking demystified: how it happens, and how to do it., 27 Jan. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: English Bread and Yeast Cookery (Cookery Library) (Paperback)
The original celebrity chef, Elizabeth David caused no less than a revolution in the Fifties with her 1951 release, French Country Cooking. It's her we have to thank for the end of an era best characterised by boiled gammon and potatoes!
English Bread and Yeast Cookery is no less a benchmark in cookery writing, taking the reader right back to first principals with full information on the workings of yeast, a history of baking, and a slightly disturbing account of commercial bread-baking in the Seventies (the book was first published in 1977, towards the end of a dark era in bought bread, as anyone who was there will remember!).
With its absorbing historical and background content, this 592-page book is a cover-to-cover read - especially for accomplished home bakers.
It gives full 'features and benefits' accounts of different grain, flours and yeast forms, a wonderful range of recipes and techniques (including crumpets, muffins, potato and rice breads), an explanation of loaf types (very useful in the baker's!), plus full information on additives such as sugar, malt, salt and so on.
Essential reading for anyone who's serious about their baking - and equally essential if the whole subject is a mystery. At the end of this book, you will be a guaranteed solid gold expert!
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 4 Jan 2011, 15:58:37 GMT
Peasant says:
Elizabeth David introduced us to the peasant food of the mediterranean. If you want to see what we lost when we went on a wild goose chase after pizza and ciabatta, do read this book; this is ENGLiSH food after all. Also read Dorothy Hartley, "Food in England" - a book which treats our own traditional cooking to the loving attention Elizabeth David gave to that of France

Posted on 3 Mar 2011, 07:38:31 GMT
A Reader says:
Elizabeth David was never a celebrity chef.

In reply to an earlier post on 4 Mar 2011, 17:37:07 GMT
Peasant says:
I suppose it depends what you mean by "celebrity chef". I think she was a celebrity (after her death, her wooden spoons and kitchen stuff featured in an auction in which people wishing to buy what amounted to a relic clamoured for the most trivial items. But is you mean she wasn't a chef, of course you're quite right. I expect it's just an honest slip by "A customer"
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