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11 of 35 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars It a cookery book, 23 May 2013
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This review is from: The Forager's Kitchen: Over 100 easy recipes, from savoury to sweet (Hardcover)
I would never call this anything other than a cookery book, why bother using the term foragers, when plants like elder and blackberry are so common that everyone knows about these and making something out of them is in just about every cookery and wine book going. You don't really need to forage for these items, since they are so common they grow everywhere.
I was thinking this would be a true foraging book, that told you how to cook things that needed special preparation, because of the type of plant it was, rather than here are a load of recipes that you can find in any number of old cookery books.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 16 Dec 2015 18:04:14 GMT
I feel that you have failed to understand what the term 'forage' means. Foraging by definition means searching for a wild food source. The ease at which one can find these items, has no requirement to whether it is actually foraging or not.

Posted on 20 Jan 2016 18:12:34 GMT
Last edited by the author on 20 Jan 2016 18:13:43 GMT
"Any number of old cookery books".
Yes, my recipe for pontack is indeed a variation on one that I spied in A Modern Herbal by Mrs. M. Grieve (Introduced by Mrs. C.F..Leyel). I believe that it is very important to credit the original source of a recipe (even if I change it) and for this reason, it may well appear that the recipes are in 'any old cookery books.'
I do however, challenge you to show me the seaweed collection of recipes in 'any old books.' Take seaweed popcorn for example, the inspiration for this recipe came from a medical student attached to my husband's Outer Hebridean practice. This is a generic foraging book, it doesn't include acorn or seaweed flour but it does include meadowsweet and sweet cicely, both of which are a little less dull than elderflower. Nature is clever the meadowsweet comes into season as the elder blossom fades.

In reply to an earlier post on 20 Jan 2016 20:51:11 GMT
Devman says:
Maybe my assessment appears to be a little harsh, but the title suggests to me, foraging for the kitchen, rather than a foraged food cookery book. I agree nature is clever with one variety of wild food taking over from the next, with short lived little surprises that add to the abundance of food that can be had from the wild. I really was expecting a book that gave a description of the wild foods along with pictures for identification.

Posted on 22 Jan 2016 20:34:04 GMT
I'm not sure what I can add Devman, I think there has been a missing of minds, it is a recipe book but with interesting folklore and history. There are stunning photographs of the chosen ingredients but they were not taken for ID purposes. If you are interested in seaweed I'll send you a copy of that book. You will however, need to get hold of a decent book for ID because it is mostly text and recipes. I suggest Seaweeds of Britain and Ireland by Bunker(s), Maggs and Brodie.Contact me via Seaweed Na Mara (blog).
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