Shop now Shop now Shop now Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Customer Review

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good with misleading title, 18 Mar. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: National Geographic Complete Photography (Hardcover)
This book has many excellent features but it is not 'complete' as the title suggests. nor can any single book reasonably be a complete guide to photography. The misleading title loses it one star.
As you would expect from National Geographic, the quality of the material on composition, use of light and analysis of photographs is very, very good.
The timeline of photography section is interesting and remarkably fair to non-American contributors to the development of photography for a US publication.
It is less fair in some other places, notably forgetting Swan's joint invention of incandescent lighting (with Edison).
The second star goes because some of the technical material has either been poorly written or badly edited; it is difficult to tell which.
The book perpetuates the myth that a 50mm lens on a full-frame camera mimics the field of view of the human eye; it assuredly does not. The eye is not a camera and the eye-brain system has a field of view of about 190 degrees by 135 degrees which is much closer to a seriously expensive wide angle lens. Perhaps not a killer mistake, but National Geographic should know better.
There is also some really weird stuff. About zoom lenses: "photographic purists will tell you that their angle of refraction is not equal to their angle of reflection"!. What? This is either drivel or needs a lot more explanation. (Reflections in non-mirror lenses is undesirable whereas without refraction they wouldn't work at all.)
The software section makes no serious mention of the Aperture/Lightroom class of programs, a serious omission when they, rightly, emphasize the use of raw image recording.
The bit about Photoshop layers is rather confused, too. Adjustment Layers are a particular type of layer in Photoshop, not a name for all types of layer.
Talking about printing, the assertion is made that printers are "optimized for 300dpi". Well, some may be, Epsons almost certainly are not since their basic movement unit corresponds to 360dpi. The information is probably useless anyway.
To sum up: excellent on the artistic end, much less good at the craft side of photography and certainly not complete. Since the opening chapters make the point that photography is both an art and a craft, National Geographic need to do better with the next edition.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No

[Add comment]
Post a comment
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Amazon will display this name with all your submissions, including reviews and discussion posts. (Learn more)
Name:
Badge:
This badge will be assigned to you and will appear along with your name.
There was an error. Please try again.
Please see the full guidelines ">here.

Official Comment

As a representative of this product you can post one Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
The following name and badge will be shown with this comment:
 (edit name)
After clicking on the Post button you will be asked to create your public name, which will be shown with all your contributions.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.  Learn more
Otherwise, you can still post a regular comment on this review.

Is this your product?

If you are the author, artist, manufacturer or an official representative of this product, you can post an Official Comment on this review. It will appear immediately below the review wherever it is displayed.   Learn more
 
System timed out

We were unable to verify whether you represent the product. Please try again later, or retry now. Otherwise you can post a regular comment.

Since you previously posted an Official Comment, this comment will appear in the comment section below. You also have the option to edit your Official Comment.   Learn more
The maximum number of Official Comments have been posted. This comment will appear in the comment section below.   Learn more
Prompts for sign-in
  [Cancel]

Comments

Track comments by e-mail

Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 29 Mar 2012 16:11:26 BDT
Bob Margolis says:
I've found another glaring technical error! The book asserts that a digital sensor can cope with the same range of brightness as transparency film, 5 stops. This may have been true ten years ago but hasn't been for a long time. DXOLabs have done a lot of tests and just about all managed 10 stops, way beyong print film. A humble entry dSLR (Nikon 3100) manages over 11 and serious dSLRs manage 12 plus.
Still 3 stars because of the rest of the good stuff.
‹ Previous 1 Next ›

Review Details

Item

Reviewer


Location: Hampshire, UK

Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,082,297