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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Victorian Standards!, 12 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: The Last Foundling: A little boy left behind, The mother who wanted him back (Kindle Edition)
Yet another example of the hypocritical statements still made by the educationally challenged about returning to 'Victorian Standards'. These days, Tom would be kept by his mother without the ridiculous religion based stigma of being born outside wedlock with the ongoing attitude that he was somewhat 'unclean' and not acceptable in the community where, when the arithmatic is done, it used to be found that a very high percentage of children were actually conceived outside wedlock, but due to hypocricy once again, things were put right by a shot gun wedding. My ex wife, became pregnant when she was 21, couldn't tell her parents until her son was six months old, even though her mother was pregnant when she got married. When we married in 1967, we lied about our son's terrible unclean past, which would seem ridiculous today, I am glad to say. She kept him prior to meeting me against all odds, and all credit to her. This book illustrates once again, just how society has moved on for the better. I did, however, find it to be a bit long, and carried on to the end to find out what happened, which, as opposed to many re-unions like this seems to have worked out very well. More of a woman's book. Finally, I am amazed at Tom's memory for names, dates, places and addresses even before he was five?
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 26 Dec 2014 14:05:35 GMT
RC says:
Certain events in one's early life can have an impact and a half on one's memory dependent on their (the event's) poignancy irrespective of how young one was at the time. I certainly remember being traumatised by seeing a nun at a primary school beating a boy with a cricket stump on his thigh.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Dec 2014 16:19:12 GMT
A friend of mine also remembers being cained on the hand by the nice kind nuns, for the crime of being left handed! However, it did her a favour. She now hates and despises all religion. Philosophy got me to that opinion.

In reply to an earlier post on 26 Dec 2014 16:28:36 GMT
RC says:
It's amazing. I've only had acquaintance with two Orders of nuns - Sisters of Mercy and Sisters of Charity - and quite frankly both Orders could have been prosecuted under the Trade Description Act.
It was reading Jean Paul Satre for French A' level that convinced me that religion is a man made gearing device.
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