Learn more Download now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more

Customer Review

on 20 June 2011
There are some books that catch your unawares when you least expect it. They take you away to a world you aren't sure will be your `cup of tea' and captivate you, they make you want to read the whole book in a sitting or two whilst also wanting to make every single page count. You are bereft when the book finishes is and you can't stop talking about it at any opportunity you get. `The Proof of Love' by Catherine Hall is a book that did just that. I admit that if someone had said `read a book about a Cambridge mathematician who escapes the academic world by voluntarily farming in the lake district in the 1970's' I probably would have said, very politely, `I'm not sure that's my thing'. However I couldn't have been more wrong by this exceptional novel which will be flying into my top five books of the year so far no questions.

Spencer Little arrives in a rural village in the Lake District by bicycle on the hottest day of the sweltering summer of 1976 looking for nothing more than work in exchange for lodging and board. He decides to try the first farm he comes across, Mirethwaite, and the home of the Dodd's family. Here he becomes a kind of addition to a rather interesting family consisting of the young and loveably precocious ten year old Alice, her subdued mother Mary and the head of the household, and rather frightening, Hartley, a man fuelled by alcohol and anger. It's an interesting dynamic to a tale about rural life and `incomers' as well as one of just why Spencer is escaping from the very start and one that becomes more compelling as it goes.

As well as there being the family dynamic in `The Proof of Love' Catherine Hall also introduces the villagers and village life. She also makes sheep farming and village fetes rather exciting which I think deserves a mention, I was honestly on the edge of my seat during a scene involving the removal of a ram's horns. One of my favourite characters was the elderly spinster Dorothy Wilkinson, who in a way becomes the middle man of the story and gives it a peripheral view on occasion, who many people think is `a witch' and yet is one of the few people to befriend this new outsider Spencer. She also manages to encapsulate the gossip and one up man ship caused by boredom and small minds in the women of the town, the men are too often in the pub and not seen so often, in fact it's these very things that give the book its great twists as it moves forward.

Catherine does something very clever with Spencer. He does both alienate and ingratiate himself in village life. He builds a lovely relationship with the young Alice Dodds, whilst also trying to keep everyone at arms length. Ask him anything about Cambridge and he shuts down, this off course adds a second strand to the tale of just why he left and encourages us to read on. It's like a story of a man's struggle to reinvent himself as the man who he really is. You will of course probably need to read the book, and indeed you should, in order to get what I mean and see the brilliance of Hall's writing as she achieves that.

As I mentioned I didn't think that this would be a book that was my sort of thing but I was proven 100% wrong as Catherine Hall weaved me into a subtle and sublime tale that shocks its reader in quick succession half way through and within pages gives the reader a real foreboding of what might be coming for the final 100 pages. You want to read on and you daren't all at once. I wonder if it's that factor that has caused the `Sarah Waters meets Daphne Du Maurier' quote. It's a big hype for any author to be compared to these two novelists, and one I don't think it's fair to call. In fact I think Catherine Hall deserves to simply be called a brilliant author in her own right.
I can't hide the fact that I loved `The Proof of Love'. It's a book that gently weaves you in. You become both an `outcomer' and one of the locals. You are part of the loneliness and isolation of Spencer as well as the gossiping heart of the community, part of the mystery and part of the suspicions. It's a very subtly clever book, it doesn't show off the fact that it's a rare and wonderful book at any point, but I can assure you it is.
11 Comment| 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse| Permalink
What's this?

What are product links?

In the text of your review, you can link directly to any product offered on Amazon.com. To insert a product link, follow these steps:
1. Find the product you want to reference on Amazon.com
2. Copy the web address of the product
3. Click Insert product link
4. Paste the web address in the box
5. Click Select
6. Selecting the item displayed will insert text that looks like this: [[ASIN:014312854XHamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)]]
7. When your review is displayed on Amazon.com, this text will be transformed into a hyperlink, like this:Hamlet (The Pelican Shakespeare)

You are limited to 10 product links in your review, and your link text may not be longer than 256 characters.