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Customer Review

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Needs to be updated, 24 Nov. 2004
This review is from: 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing (Paperback)
I found this book very interesting and really easy to read, but the examples need updating. Things have changed a bit in the last 11 years (this book was written in 1993) and reading things like "Microsoft is the leader in personal computer operating systems, but it trails the leaders in each of the following major categories: spreadsheets (Lotus), word processing (WordPerfect) and business graphics (Harvard graphics)" can't fail to put a smile on your face. I think that the laws still hold true though. One more thing: the book has been written by Americans for Americans and certain brands mentioned in it are not well known in Europe, if at all. It's still worth reading, in my opinion.
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Showing 1-3 of 3 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 23 Oct 2011, 15:58:31 BST
Jeff says:
Minor points imo. It's not relevant that microsoft are now the leader in office tools and it applies imo to all business. People are people. If anything the examples being old make it far more interesting because you can actually look and see how things have changed and try to understand why from the perspective of the 22 laws.

In reply to an earlier post on 18 Dec 2012, 20:39:27 GMT
S. Morris says:
But taking the Excel example it disproves the first law which states that people remember the leaders but not the followers.
I remember Lotus 1-2-3 but I'm sure that many of the younger generation have never heard of it.
That example shows that followers will often surpass the leaders because the leaders set the goal posts.
Hoover and Dyson would be another good example.
I suppose the whole concept is a little like a horse in a race. The early leader is seldom the one to cross the line first.
I think that the book is useful but from the reverse perspective of intended in that you can see where history has rendered the theories incorrect and that in itself is a sound lesson in marketing.

In reply to an earlier post on 23 Jan 2016, 21:29:10 GMT
Last edited by the author on 23 Jan 2016, 21:31:30 GMT
CapStone says:
This Lotus 123/Excel example is actually a great business case study. I think you've missed the point, however. The book is addressing the leader/follower dynamic purely from a marketing standpoint. If all things were equal between Lotus 123 and Excel, Lotus would still be the market leader, because it was known first (going by the assertion of the book).

Excel's eventual dominance was for strategic (not marketing) reasons. For example it was part of a suite of applications all of which were of important use to most if not all of Lotus 123's existing and potential customers. Microsoft (Excel's maker) already dominated the PC platform market on which Lotus 123 depended to deploy its product. Further, Microsoft bundled its office suite (which included Excel) into pre-installed Windows machines. Under those circumstances, it was really only a matter of time until Excel dominated the market.
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