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24 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A remarkable piece of Austen scholarship, 23 July 2001
This review is from: Pride and Promiscuity: The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen (Hardcover)
As the classic cartoon has it: "We like the book, Miss Austen, but all this effing and blinding will have to go".
Eckstut and Ashton have unearthed a remarkable trove of documents: material cut from Jane Austen's novels, as well as a letter from her publisher and others from Jane Austen herself. The pure vision of Austen's work must be re-evaluated in the light of this crucial discovery; indeed, one can easily see why such material would not have been considered publishable at the time; at the very least it would have been considered risque in the extreme.
Some have claimed that this document is a work of pastiche by Eckstut and Ashton, produced for the amusement of modern readers, but this is clearly ridiculous.
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Showing 1-2 of 2 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 7 Feb 2013 10:28:27 GMT
Last edited by the author on 7 Feb 2013 10:46:11 GMT
Taranis says:
I'm afraid it's your review that is clearly ridiculous. The whole thing, to any one with any literary intelligence and sensibility, is transparently a wind-up, a rather feeble and half-hearted literary 'hoax' if you like.

Austen was far too deeply conditioned by the sexual mores and reticence of her times, to have ever written such stuff, even in private. It doesn't even read as authentic for heaven's sake.

This should also be obvious from the fact that, as it says in the author's bio, 'Arielle Eckstut has written over 150 critical essays on Austen (although none, as yet, have been published) ??'

If Eckstut was a serious, bona fide, Austen scholar, do you think all of her many essays would have remained unpublished?

If you don't believe me, just take a look at the various reviews of the book written by newspaper reviewers and academics when the book was published in 2001.

Get yourself an ejucashon.

In reply to an earlier post on 28 Aug 2013 17:13:43 BDT
Um. I think you'lll find Roger is being ironic, Taranis....
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