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Customer Review

43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Truth at last??, 20 Oct. 2009
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This review is from: Richard III and the Murder in the Tower (Hardcover)
Whilst I am a Ricardian at heart and can argue his "innocence" as regards the Princes in the tower.....(Henry VII and his role in their disappearance has not been inspected closely enough in my view) ...his murder of William Lord Hastings has left a bad taste in the mouth and difficult to explain. The Woodville plot and role of Jane Shore as some kind of go between just doesn`t ring true, and the report from More about Richard`s withered arm and sorcery belongs in childrens fiction.
Until now..... Mr Hancock has provided a well reasoned argument for Hastings despatch and Richards behaviour, based on the loyalty vs betrayal in the latters mind that fateful morning, and why his mood changed so dramatically.
The role of Catesby and his family connection to Eleanor Butler is appealing and his execution post Bosworth endorses the view. Maybe some day documentation from the pre-contract may emerge.....until then this explanation is the most convincing.
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Showing 1-4 of 4 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 5 Nov 2010, 16:14:43 GMT
Dear Rooster

I didn't really enjoy history at school. Now being middle-aged, for want of a better label, I find it informing and intriguing. I read (quite by accident) Josephine Tey's "The Daughter of Time" which deals in a pseudo-detective way with what I think are genuinely researched facts surrounding this subject. It got me thoroughly hooked and I hope you have read it or will do so. A novel. Not earthshattering but well-written and easy to read. Made me think...!

In reply to an earlier post on 16 Dec 2010, 15:02:34 GMT
D. Hay says:
many thanks,

I have read Tey`s book and thoroughly enjoyed it, a bit like Holmes and Watson but very thought provoking.
Can I suggest Bertram Fields book, "Royal Blood" which is a barristers view of events played out as some retrospective trial based on material written at the time and what the motivation of the author was. I especially liked his venture into fantasy in the last chapter and what may have happened if Richard had not taken the thrown in the Summer of 1483.
Unfortunately the "Tudor" view has more "text" still, and we can never know the truth which is far from clear. Shakespeare`s writings may be a triumph for literature but a tragedy for history.

Rooster

In reply to an earlier post on 7 Dec 2013, 00:02:11 GMT
I much appreciate Peter Hancock's new approach to the murder of Hastings, and since to my mind he has pinpointed the right person in Catesby, what a pity he didn't go on and note his connection to and with Margaret Beaufort, the real moving force behind the Tudor victory.

In reply to an earlier post on 5 Feb 2016, 03:22:11 GMT
Banditqueen says:
I enjoyed the book Daughter of Tey but really believe that it is over hyped. It is a novel not a history book. Yes the late author researched her stuff but it is not the end of the debate but the beginning. Solid research of the sources and interpretation by historians, that is what I would read.
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