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Customer Review

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A profound, thought-provoking and epic film, 25 Feb. 2008
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This review is from: Unforgiven [1992] [DVD] (DVD)
This film tells a story in a rather indirect way. From the prologue, which tells us about a comely and virtuous woman who marries a violent and angry man, we don't quite know where we are.

Then we see a gruesome attack of a prostitute and some rather unexpected summary justice from Little Bill (Gene Hackman). From this point onwards, the story, and the characters, tilt one way and the other. You like Little Bill, but he takes things too far. You like the Eastwood character, but you can't entirely forgive him, and you can see him sliding downwards.

The action has lingered with me for several days. What does this film have to say about hellraisers? What am I to make of the amazing denouement? Is there any justice in the ending?

Looking back there are scenes that you remember, like the mythical gunslinger missing a simple target over and over again, or Little Bill and his hopeless roof-building. The details ornament the story in delightful ways.

It's an absorbing film which confronts you with much complexity. Should law enforcers make examples of people? Do light punishments cause greater troubles? How do mythologies influence our actions? This is a very special film.
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Showing 1-1 of 1 posts in this discussion
Initial post: 16 Mar 2008 01:42:21 GMT
Last edited by the author on 16 Mar 2008 01:51:18 GMT
I. Thomson says:
This is review is a fair point to make about this film. Even though, i believe that William Munny (Eastwood) was protrayed as a geniune but troubled man, faithful to his late wife and one who was "actually" shamed of his past. Yes, i agree we are not entirely sure he should be forgiven for the horrible acts that he committed in his lifetime, but if one thing is clear, he is determined to put things right. The last scene when he threatens to kill all the town folk of Big Whiskey, Wyoming if they don't bury his longtime pal properly shows his anger at the ignorance of a town that fails to gel and allowed itself to become dominated by corruption and violence hence Little Bill which he has learnt doesn't solve problems for long, a town that has been at war with itself with little peace and comfort. The end scroll shows that whilst he moved to California with his two children, that Munny wasn't really understood by anyone, largely a recluse and loner, forever to be constantly stereotyped as a killer and how it was his only way of life that was substanable as a source of money. the film indicates that he does care and does have feelings, although hidden from view, although only the scarred girl understands this.
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