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Customer Review

on 10 February 2014
Mexican film-maker Carlos Reygadas returns with his most ambitious film yet with ‘Post Tenebras Lux’, in the most part using a self-made beer-glass camera lens which refracts his figures, doubles the image and leaves the screen’s borders blurred.

The opening sequence sums up the dreamlike drama of this film, where a young child is surrounded by a pack of dogs and horses from daylight to darkness. Your mind starts to panic as you assume the worst will happen, questions go through your mind about the wellbeing of the child. Its an unnerving scene. Things get stranger still, with a series of seemingly unconnected stories; where English children play rugby in a school; a red Lucifer/goat-like figure making housecalls with a toolbox; and a bathhouse where orgies take place in rooms named after Hegel and Duchamp. Inbetween the many short stories, a couple called Juan (Adolfo Jiménez Castro) and Natalia (Nathalia Acevedo) live in a big house with their children in the mountains somewhere in Mexico. Their lives and the people that work for them are the only concentrated narrative strands running through this film.

These disparate short stories seem to be used to map out the different aspects of Reygadas’s home country. The rugby match is the one scene that doesn’t fit into this film, I assume its used as a unifying concept for Mexico’s people who shouldn’t be fighting amongst themselves but working as a team for the greater good, regardless of their backgrounds and beliefs.

‘Post Tenebras Lux’ is a sketchy film that flits between the real and unreal. By taking so many different snapshots of life, the message is often lost. These broad brushstrokes are occasionally impressive in situations you least expect, such as in the forest and the headless man. Beautifully filmed, Reygadas’s vision and imagination unlocks images you may not have seen otherwise, or unsuspecting thoughts and feelings. There’s a lot to ponder in ‘Post Tenebras Lux’ but a lot that you may cast aside just as quickly, what’s left may be all you need from this film.
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Product Details

3.2 out of 5 stars
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3.2 out of 5 stars
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