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4.6 out of 5 stars
5
The Stormwatcher
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£4.79

on 9 November 2014
Like all Graham Joyce's books this is a can't put downer from beginning to end. The characters as always are powerful and credible. The story line flows bringing the book to an end with the usual twists and turns. Graham Joyce will be sadly missed as I don't know where to go once I finish reading his brilliant books.
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on 17 December 2011
Graham Joyce is such a wonderfully reliable writer. He creates strongly realised characters and plots that often have a slightly other-worldly twist, but never leave the reader in doubt that he is in command of the here and now. The effect is often subtle and running parallel to the twist is always the possibility of a rational or psychological explanation. In The Storm Watcher, Sabine and James are on holiday with their daughters Jessie (11) and Beth (7). James (who unknown to Sabine is paying for everyone) has invited Matt and Chrissie, and the subtext here is that Matt was recently `let go' from James's Advertising Agency. James has also invited Rachel, his secretary, with whom he has had an affair, though Sabine doesn't know about that.

It becomes quickly established that one of the guests has a particular and perhaps not entirely healthy `bond' with the eldest of the children, Jessie. We are not enlightened as to who this is until near the end of the book, which does generate some added tension - though there is already plenty of that in the various relationships. The guests visit caves, swim in the villa's pool and slowly, as storm-clouds gather, the deterioration of the holiday atmosphere contributes to a riveting climax when danger threatens one of the children.

No one is entirely blameless in this atmospheric and compelling story which ends with a strangely fitting tragedy. I found myself glued all the way to this marvellously evocative story.
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on 8 March 1999
Joyce uses every childhood memory to create a feeling of discontent; he preys on traditions and uses pathetic fallacy at every turn to show the dysfunction that lies within us all. This is a somewhat melancholy book, designed to provoke a process of thought more than to satisfy curiosities. It is an incisive look at the way in which communication falls apart and the trauma of rebuilding bridges.
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on 28 October 1999
Not better than Tooth Fairy but still very very good. My awe for Graham Joyce is growing by the book.
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on 11 June 1999
Read this. Then Read the Tooth Fairy.
Enough said.
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