Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Learn more Fitbit



There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 22 September 2014
This is a thought-provoking vision of potential for the future of the western economies. It analyses potential global risks to growth as well as the invisible influences that can shape a nations prosperity. It considers hard and soft power, and population/domgraphic trends around the globe, and argues that we shouldn't be too concerned for our futures. I was most fascinated by the population analysis - that globally one in six people will be over the age of 65 by 2050, and that the over 80's are the fastest growing segment in Europe - and yet a half of India's 1.2 billion people are under 27. India accounts for a sixth of global population. Well worth the read......
0Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 July 2014
Not necessarily an easy read, but worth dipping into and understanding something of the complex interactions occurring at national and international levels. It doesn't give a recipe for success, but gives a high-level view of what could be achieved if the political and business wills recognised mutually beneficial activities. Chapter 5 and the final chapter are probably of interest if you want to limit things to the European perspective - but dig into the rest of it for a better sense of what is going on.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 December 2014
Amongst so much gloom and negativity it was a joy to read about why we should have some optimism. I cannot help it, I do let the pessimists rattle my longer term beliefs when there are waves of bad news and try as I might I let the purveyors of doom make me hesitate when making investment decisions: instinctively I am positive about the future but I am not fully able to articulate nor support any optimism as extensively as Gerard Lyons. The fact is that economists are not good forecasters: they did not warm me of the financial crisis when they had all the data they needed; nor did they tell me about even the possibility of the recent dramatic fall in oil prices. So when I read of economists' gloom I now think of the author's big pictures. Thank you Gerard for redressing the miserable rhetoric of many of your profession.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 8 July 2014
I don't normally read books about economics as I feel that they'll either be too confusing or too boring. I liked the cover so decided on a whim to give it a go.

I would highly recommend it. It's easy to read, very interesting and not pretentious. The book is also laid out in nice well rounded chapters which means it has been easy to dip in and out of on the commute on the way to work and I finished it relatively quickly in comparison to other books by academics i've read/tried to.

Also,it's nice to read something that's not completely pessimistic about the world, so gives me something different to say to my colleagues!
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 March 2015
It is a really informative and thought-provoking book: well-referenced and well argued. Highly recommended!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 November 2014
Too much of "what I did in my long career". Panglossian.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 May 2016
VERY GOOD BOOK
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 July 2014
Economic adviser to Boris,god help us. Apparently everything is honky dory for the top 1% so stop worrying.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)