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on 16 February 2015
This book is so badly written that several times I almost stopped reading it. I then skim-read most of it, and it doesn't deserve more. Clearly it isn't written by Rifkin but by a couple of reseach assistants, neither of whom arer good at writing simply in plain English. Nor has it been edited to reduce a lot of repetition and overlap in the chapters.
The internet of things is not nearly such a big deal as Rifkin makes out and a lot of the stats are almost irrelevant. The 'future of technology' is always different from what people like Rifkin predict.
The one big idea in the book, that the internet of things and associated technology will enable humans to increase the efficiency of their energy use from 13% towards 40%, is both madly optimistic and completely unjustified by any evidence or calculations.
The collaborative commons is indeed happening, but the most interesting stuff isn't to do with 'economics' at all, it's the redefinition of the artistic enterprise to define it, as it was until recently, as a gift.
The book is worth 50 or 60 pages: an essay. The rest is waffle, and badly written waffle too.
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on 8 January 2017
This is probably Jeremy Rifkin's crowning achievement, pulling together a vast amount of research, technology, economics and human history into a coherent, highly readable book which offers accounts of how we got to where we are today as well as myriad visions of a bright future for humanity without dumbing down, avoiding macro problems or overly simplyfying.

It stacks up very well in comparison to books like Postcapitalism by Paul Mason and Rise of the Robots by Martin Ford. It is particularly notable for it's consistent application of economics as part of it's analysis primarily tackling the tendency of internet based services profit margins declining towards zero and then extrapolating that this tendency is not limited to internet services alone.
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on 4 June 2017
A must read for anyone interested in the future of Commons Economics. Jeremy Rifkin is a futurist who has spent alot of time thinking about the past and how the present will reshape our future.
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on 16 October 2016
Well written, good academia, rhetorical and policy mix. Gives an insightful and reasoned opinion as to how capitalism is evolving into the collaborative commons. Whilst i buy 90% of the theory i still believe that capitalism and investment is needed for new and better products, and that finance has to be made via some means.
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on 13 August 2017
Great value
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on 19 March 2016
A must read for any intellectual and/or transitional philosopher; in fact, for everyone out there. Style: cobbled together, incoherent. Content: in this case, it is the idea that counts.
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on 12 June 2017
Good
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on 3 January 2016
Well received, somewhat self-promotional, but a well known author working on these topics. Useful
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on 24 July 2016
Probably one of the most important books you will ever read. Eloquently put forward Rifkin provides an understandable and clear insight into the way mankind has evolved from two hundred years ago to now, and our journey going forward in the next five to forty years.
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on 20 June 2014
It explains the history of capitalism over the last 200 years and why the logic of capitalism is approaching its end game. How new technology is facilitating the emergence of a new more collaborative culture; that is both socially and ecologically more inclusive. A clear, incisive book.
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