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on 2 April 2014
Having read all of the series, it wasn't by any means drudgery, but there were plenty of irritants. The writer puts a storyline together well, even if some bits are pinched from other writers. I can only assume that Ms Stark, while perhaps being an academic, has the regular failings of an academic in terms of spelling, punctuation and syntax. Certainly her books cannot have had an editor or the quite appalling spelling mistakes would never have made print.
Nor could she have had historical back-up. Frigates were never '64s', nor would a sloop have a post captain and four lieutenants; the prose is littered with factual horrors.
The storyline is interesting, although the rather staccato method of delivery often switches from one destination to another with nary a line about the journey between. The stories are also rather improbable and the hero and his escapades are perhaps more suited to a schoolboy's story book. The language used would never have been used in the early 19th Century as it is littered with Americanisms that a Briton would never use today, let alone in those days. A Brit would have 'dived' nor 'dove', for example. And of 'English ships', 'English sailors', with the occasional 'British', but the latter was outnumbered by the former 10-1. The Acts of Union of 1536, linking England and Wales, and of 1707 linking those two with Scotland to form Great Britain, meant that thereafter there was no 'English navy'. Indeed, most of the crews were proportionate combinations of all of those nations (others too), so that to constantly use 'English' is a regular irritant to readers from those other countries.
Looking at Ms Stark's other books, I saw one which drew on a map of England and Wales as its cover.....the 'E' of England is lodged firmly in mid-Wales. Use of the English language, therefore, historical accuracy, and geographic failings, all combine to give some reasonable light readings only two stars.
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on 11 May 2014
Like all the books in this series it is an entertaining read, notwithstanding on having to suspend credulity and ignore errors. Easy reading as one knows the hero always prevails.
Really they are more like "Boys Own Paper" yarns but still enjoyable !
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on 4 April 2016
Good story line but ruined in parts by the bad spelling. This seems to be the norm for the books from Amazon lately with bad spelling mistakes and bad grammar. I feel that Amazon should start getting some proof reading carried before putting books on line.
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on 17 July 2014
The books are desperately short on accuracy about life on board an RN ship of the time. Stories are difficult to give credence. Looks like an author who wants to cash in on the popularity of such books but does not have the background so to do.
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on 22 September 2014
ok
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on 22 June 2014
Totally inaccurate stopped reading when it said the Victory was the first ship to engage. It was in fact the Royal Sovereign which had been recently dry docked and had her bottom cleaned exactly the reverse of what the author writes.
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on 4 December 2014
Light reading .have read the whole set. A little bit predictable but still a pleasant read I would recommend these if you like sea stories
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on 30 August 2014
Good tale.
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on 21 November 2014
The phrase "His Annie's" is making my teeth curl!
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on 7 March 2015
Great series recommend for all Nelsons navy enthusiasts
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