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on 16 April 2015
A thoughtful well executed book, that covered every angle.
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on 6 July 2014
A bit short and a few printing/typing errors. Certainly an interesting read and food for thought.
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on 29 June 2014
Read in a morning this book gives some interesting theories about the prince's and what happened.I would recommend reading it
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on 23 December 2013
The writer, a former policeman, freely admits his lack of literary talent, and it is not a well written book. It is a useful summation of the facts of the case, shorn of the justifications and speculations of historians. He zeros in on the known actions of his suspects and uses those to formulate his suspicions. As his conclusion is the same as my own pet theory I was quite happy with the book. I feel this book would be useful for people who don't normally read history books, but who just want to know the facts about the mystery.
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on 13 January 2014
Without giving anything away, this book casts an entirely new light on the events of 1483 and the disappearance of the "Princes in the Tower". The author scrutinises all the usual suspects (and a few new ones!) and comes to a rather surprising conclusion! I'm not sure how valid his arguments are as he obviously has little concrete evidence to go on, but he uses modern detective methods to reach his personal opinion. Interesting and different
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on 7 December 2014
I thought this book was interesting, and although I am a history fan, I did learn a few things I didn't, know, I can't say I agree with his conclusion. Apart from Richard 111, being a good suspect of the murders of the prince's in the tower, I am more inclined to believe it was Margaret Beaufort she was very ambitious for her son and she would have attempted anything to make sure her son was on the throne, which of course he could not obtain while the prince's were still alive. I believe she had a hand in this murder and this act probably has been the reason why she became a deeply religious woman for the rest of her life, ( Guilt ? )
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Unlike most of the reviewers on here I bought the Audible version. I bought this book thinking it would be dreary but might bring out a few new discoveries.

The narrator's voice was very pleasant and of course being the Audible version I could listen while doing other things

Since the discovery of Richard III's body I have often wondered if dna from bones discovered in the tower might now be confirmed as those of the princes but now I know, alas, that Richard was their paternal uncle. I did not know that when bones thought to be the Princes in the tower l were found dueing the time of Charles 1st they were left unguarded and anyone could have had a rummage and some replaced one taken with someone else's bone or an animal bone.

If you are into British history this book may direct you down other paths you might not have thought of.

My personal view is that Margaret Beaufort might have had a finger in their disappearance as soon as Richard III was toppled thus ensuring her son Henry VII would not have them hanging around his neck also that her son could marry to bring the families of Lancaster and York together.
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on 9 May 2014
I liked this story very much. After reading this story i now believe Richard the 111 was not the one to murder the two princes. my opinion but for you to read the book and see what you think.
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on 6 April 2015
Loved the way this book is presented in an objective search for the truth of what happened to the two princes. Using affirmed historical information and an investigator' s instincts the author sets out to deduce what is most likely to have happened. This investigation has also added weight to the restoration of Richard III' s much maligned character. Whilst Richard is not seen as a saint, some of the historical slurs that have abounded through the centuries are given a more objective balance.
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on 22 October 2015
This is a very good book, it very interesting to see what a real detective makes of it. The book flows well and is easy to follow. There are a couple of points I'm not sure about - some say that More was copying Mortons book (to get his own copy in the days before an infant printing industry) and that is why he never published it - it wasn't his. Morton was known to be anti-Richard of course. Also when Richard III gave away titles belonging to Edward V, Markham has it that this happened on 28th June 1483, when the princes may have still been alive. The titles would have been stripped from Edward V by attainder.
I was interested in his "surprise" suspect and can't understand why I didn't pick up on it earlier. I think his choice of "prime suspect" is very good, I used to believe it was another but now I just don't know again...!

Anyone interested in Richard III and this period of our history will enjoy this book.
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