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4.8 out of 5 stars
188
4.8 out of 5 stars
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on 28 June 2017
Fabulous insights into the creation of a Sci Fi legend.

I grew up anticipating every Dr. Who episode. Saturdays were a mix of anticipation and chastisement as the excitement built before the next episode aired. Chastisement? Yes, being yelled at by Dad to keep quiet so he could check the results against his football pool entry for the week. I wonder how many other adults cursed the BBC for putting The Doctor on straight after the results.

This is a highly informative and entertaining "documentary" detailing how Dr. Who came to be, how it nearly died, how the DALEKs almost never made the screen…
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on 21 April 2017
Excellent drama telling story how Dr Who came to be and very almost didn't, Bradley is outstanding as Hartnell, so much so rumoured will reprise role of Dr in upcoming special 10/10
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on 29 May 2017
Brilliant, with some good hidden cameos!
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on 1 April 2016
I absolutely loved this. I think it's the best thing Mark Gatiss has ever done. A perfect cast with the perfect script. A fabulous tribute to the early Doctor Who. It is a must-have.
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on 11 July 2015
We absolutely love this. A really good take on the birth pangs of this iconic TV show.
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on 18 July 2017
Good value for money !
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on 28 June 2015
Is a great dvd
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Ever since the first pictures began to leak out earlier in the year there has been a buzz that Mark Gatiss' An Adventure In Space and Time would be something special - and it didn't disappoint.

It had a lot of ground to cover - from the launch of the show in 1963 to the departure of William Hartnell in 1966. In the main, it succeeded beautifully, although there's one caveat which I'll come too in a minute.

Essentially, AAISAT was the story of four people - William Hartnell (The Doctor), Verity Lambert (Producer), Waris Hussein (Director) and Sydney Newman (BBC Head of Drama and the "father" of the series). With only 85 minutes running time it did mean that many other people's important contributions went unrecorded, such as the first story editor David Whitaker and the designers Raymond Cusick and Barry Newbery. But this was inevitable, and the decision to focus on four key people did make dramatic sense.

Cast-wise it would have been difficult to get any better than this. David Bradley was outstanding as Hartnell, capturing both his abrasive side and his more considerate nature. Brian Cox (despite a moustache that looked painted on) was good fun as the brash Canadian, Newman. And Sacha Dhwan and Jessica Raine gave lovely performances as Hussein and Lambert - two outsiders (one an asian, one a woman) who dared to breach the conservative BBC.

The re-creations - Totters Lane, the Dalek city, the breathtaking TARDIS console room - were a massive treat, as were the numerous cameos from some of the great and good of the series' past.

But with a timeframe of three years there were times when things seemed a little condensed, and my only real criticism of Mark Gatiss' script is that whilst Hartnell's difficulty with lines was well illustrated, we maybe could have done with a scene that made it clear that Hartnell was a very good actor who gave many fine performances during the three years he was in the show, right up until the end when he was far from well.

There's no doubting the love Gatiss has for both the show and Hartnell, but a short scene with Lambert and Newman discussing Hartnell's line-fluffs with Lambert championing Hartnell's performance was sadly missing. Hartnell was technically a very good actor and his years of experience in films meant that he instinctively understood the camera. An off-told story (and something else that it would have been nice to see in the show) related to Hartnell's knowledge of when the camera was focused on him in close up - so his movements were restricted - and when the camera was further away - then he could be more expansive in his gestures. This is the sort of small detail that would have illustrated how good Hartnell was - otherwise you could come away from this programme thinking that Hartnell was just an old duffer who couldn't remember his lines.

But that apart, there was so much to enjoy here and by the end, with an ailing Hartnell forced to leave the part he loved, it was truly heartbreaking.

The surprise cameo at the end was a nice touch and an acknowledgement that today Doctor Who owes everything to one person - not Sydney Newman, not Verity Lambert, not even Dalek creator Terry Nation - but William Hartnell. If he hadn't made the Doctor such a compelling character then the series would never have endured. On the eve of the programme's 50th anniversary AAISAT is a fitting tribute to an old-fashioned actor who started something which still entertains today, and, I'm sure, for many more years to come.
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on 23 January 2014
When I read about this docudrama about how Doctor Who came about, I was a little concerned on how it would be portrayed. I half expected the BBC to rip into William Hartnell, as he was supposedly very difficult to work with.

However, what we're given it a very funny and touching drama on how such an iconic series was created, David Bradley gives a terrific performance as William Hartnell, the first actor to play the iconic Doctor and he really makes you sympathise with him as he is eventually forced to step down from the role. The surprising cameo at the end is also a nice little touch showing how far the show has gone in the last 50 years.
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on 25 January 2014
An Adventure In Time & Space is a magnificent document about the birth of one of my favourite TV shows that I grew up with and have been watching for 40 years. What has been produced is a very well made, clever and at times very emotional story of how it all happened back in the early 1960s.
They have made a film that I enjoyed immensely and found the portrayal of the original actors as very accurate.
This film really is a beautiful tribute to William Hartnell and portrays him in a very respectful way as he deserves.
I found this film very emotional, and a few tears did flow as the story unfolded. The great love he (William) and his fans had for Doctor Who is very apparent in the film. A must get for any Doctor Who fans and fans of the history of TV from the BBC.
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