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on 13 July 2005
I read this book as an interested layperson. It addresses a number of specific and fascinating questions about intelligence, including how many different types of intelligence there are; whether our intelligence changes as we get older; the nature versus nurture debate; and the mystery of rising IQ levels. It also gives a comprehensive reading list if you want to find out more. I found it extremely clear and eminently readable. Although I have a scientific background, I wouldn't say that it was necessary in order to understand the concepts discussed. Highly recommended!
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on 17 March 2003
This is an excellent introduction to the psychological study of human intelligence. A number of important areas are desribed with clarity - psychometric models of intelligence, influence of genes and family environments, ageing, and the Flynn effect to name a few. Key studies are used to provide the reader with a sense of the evidence that supports current conceptions of different aspects of intelligence. Useful recommendations are also made for further reading. For a brief user friendly introduction to intelligence that leaves the reader ready to explore this subject further this book is highly recommended.
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on 2 April 2002
The book is very clear - great diagrams and text that simplifies the main arguements. The references suggested are also comprehensive, as a quick book for revision for whatever level, it's useful. It doesn't pretend to be a degree level text but as a first book to read on the subject, I haven't found any better introductions.
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on 15 June 2017
It does not even define what intelligence is, and there may be different interpretations about it. It is a discussion of different IQ tests.
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on 17 November 2011
The attempt to reduce intelligence to pure brain function and a set of statistics is surely a depressing indicator of modern psychology's poverty and this book does exactly that. You know your in for an unenlightening read on the whole, when immediately after the introduction, there is a chapter entitled "a word about correlation". There are some interesting things notably the chapter on rising IQ levels in particular countries, and the relation between age and intelligence. Otherwise this is an overly dry book on a subject of considerable interest.
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There isn't a single area of Psychology that elicits as much contention as the area of psychometrics. To a certain degree this is understandable, since no one wants to be told that she is not as bright as someone else, no matter how true or obvious it might be. However, of all brunches of Psychology, psychometrics has the greatest predictive power. Within the professional community many of the general aspects of intelligence are very well understood and appreciated. This VSI book is an excellent introduction to this fascinating field. It covers all the major aspects of the Intelligence research and gives directions for further reading. The style of the book is very accessible without being dumbed-down (this is not another one of those "For Dummies"-styled books). If you are serious about finding out more about what scientist know about intelligence, this would be an excellent starting point for you readings. Overall, this is a wonderful little book.
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on 22 March 2010
Ian Deary has written a meaty introduction to the subject for the layman. It discusses definitions for the terms used in the text and introduces the reader to current strands of thinking. Where there is disagreement he indicates what others than himself think, and each chapter has extensive suggestions for further reading in the area covered.For anyone new to the subject but with a serious interest in it, this is a good way to start.
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on 14 July 2014
Wasn't that smart.
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on 6 December 2014
Ian Dreary has written a very-well researched and generally un-biaised overview of various aspects of intelligence, from testing through to genetics and various controversies and un-answered aspects of research today. He lays it out in an easy-going, and at times slightly humorous manner, and very usefully includes references and annotations for further reading should you want to explore an area further. He is also clear on spelling out his own views, but in a manner that illustrates where he may not be impartial, rather than trying to indoctrinate the reader. These small "A Very Short Introduction" books are a great way of starting with a particular topic and getting a good comprehensive overview.
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on 17 January 2014
A good read, if you want to information without getting confused. Written clearly by someone that knows how to communicate.
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