Learn more Download now Browse your favorite restaurants Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 29 December 2016
The last Genesis book I read was produced in the late 1970s.
I found this very informative and revealing. I found it hard to put down.
I also think it is worth keeping as a reference book.
Some periods are only touched upon but it is a memoir rather than a text book!
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 10 November 2014
Considering he is describing 40-odd years of playing, it is a little short on detail, and to my mind, skirted over quite a lot. I am a Gabriel-period fan, and would have like to have had more detail on the making of those albums. He is exceedingly modest, particulary about his bass playing, which for me is crucial to the Genesis sound. It's all very interesting though, and can be ready in a few hours. Minor point of detail: the guy who played a double-neck guitar in Family was Charlie Whitney, not Rob Townsend. .
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 1 October 2017
One of my heros. I enjoyed the book and...when I think of Mike I think of a posh English gentleman. Goodness me! Read the book...what a revelation! Keep up the good work Mike and thank you.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 8 February 2014
If you're a fan of early Genesis, the book adds context to some of your favourite music; little that's wholly new, but presented in a candid way and with sincere respect for other band members and crew. Mike's text is occasionally annotated with his Father's narrative - small sections of his memoirs. The writer's intention is usually to draw parallels between the lives of father and son, and they work reasonably well, but you might also sense in it a craving for paternal approval. Mike's relationship with his father is explored and their mutual love and respect is evident albeit in the traditionally muted style of the British middle classes. It's all distilled in the words of Mike's hit "The Living Years", co-written with B A Robertson.

One highlight is Mike's description of the agony of a year spent away from home - if ever you could sympathise with a tax exile...
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 4 December 2014
A good read and well written in my opinion. I like to read about the lives and back stage stuff of musicians I admire and this was a good example of that. The stories and stuff about his dad also help to make him more than "just a rock star". Well worth the money spent buying the book!
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 21 March 2018
A really disappointing & boring read
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 5 April 2017
Bought this as a gift for my son-in-law who was delighted with it.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 26 February 2014
Whilst I thoroughly enjoyed the band history and reading about the circumstances surrounding member changes and recording over the years I struggled with Rutherford's concept of juxtaposing his father's anecdotes and memories with those of his own. As described in the lyrics of the classic 'The Living Years' the relationship with his father was somewhat distant (if respectful) , whereas the relationship with his Genesis cohorts was a lot closer. Perhaps the two stories should have been told in different books.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 24 July 2016
very interesting account of his life and his family as well as stuff about Genesis
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse
on 9 March 2014
Essential reading for those who follow Genesis and some interesting insights. I thought that by linking his memoirs with his father's may come over as sentimental slush but it presents a good honest account of his relationship with his father and the similarities between both lives.

One disagreement I would have with Mike is that I think Ray Wilson is actually a good songwriter but his style would not have suited the Banks-Rutherford combo.

A good read for the holiday
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you? Report abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)