Learn more Download now Browse your favorite restaurants Shop now Shop now flip flip flip Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 6 May 2018
I downloaded the kindle version of this book and found it a really enjoyable read. The way Mike Rutherford juxtaposed his career with that of his father, with whom he had a fairly difficult relationship was an interesting twist. This was aided by the fact that his father had written his own autobiography about his naval career and retirement years and many extracts from this were featured throughout. The main thrust of Mike's narrative was, as you would imagine, his Genesis years and being one of the two members of the band that were ever present (Tony Banks being the other one) his perspective on the band's legacy was fascinating to read. It was a surprise that he glossed over the Mike & the Mechanics years somewhat and the period after the Genesis glory years was more rushed than the detailed descriptions up to that point, but for hard core Genesis fans of long standing such as myself (my first Genesis gig being in May 1972),the essential stuff was covered in some detail, with many an interesting anecdote to savour. The ideas for many a classic Genesis moment initially sprang from Mike Rutherford's muse prior to being arranged by the rest of the band including: The Musical Box, Watcher of the Skies, The Cinema Show, Back in NYC, Dance on a Volcano, Eleventh Earl of Mar, Follow You Follow Me, Turn It On Again, Mama and Land of Confusion to name but ten! Recommended - a unique insight on a progressive rock legend.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 29 December 2016
The last Genesis book I read was produced in the late 1970s.
I found this very informative and revealing. I found it hard to put down.
I also think it is worth keeping as a reference book.
Some periods are only touched upon but it is a memoir rather than a text book!
2 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 10 November 2014
Considering he is describing 40-odd years of playing, it is a little short on detail, and to my mind, skirted over quite a lot. I am a Gabriel-period fan, and would have like to have had more detail on the making of those albums. He is exceedingly modest, particulary about his bass playing, which for me is crucial to the Genesis sound. It's all very interesting though, and can be ready in a few hours. Minor point of detail: the guy who played a double-neck guitar in Family was Charlie Whitney, not Rob Townsend. .
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 1 October 2017
One of my heros. I enjoyed the book and...when I think of Mike I think of a posh English gentleman. Goodness me! Read the book...what a revelation! Keep up the good work Mike and thank you.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 8 February 2014
If you're a fan of early Genesis, the book adds context to some of your favourite music; little that's wholly new, but presented in a candid way and with sincere respect for other band members and crew. Mike's text is occasionally annotated with his Father's narrative - small sections of his memoirs. The writer's intention is usually to draw parallels between the lives of father and son, and they work reasonably well, but you might also sense in it a craving for paternal approval. Mike's relationship with his father is explored and their mutual love and respect is evident albeit in the traditionally muted style of the British middle classes. It's all distilled in the words of Mike's hit "The Living Years", co-written with B A Robertson.

One highlight is Mike's description of the agony of a year spent away from home - if ever you could sympathise with a tax exile...
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 4 December 2014
A good read and well written in my opinion. I like to read about the lives and back stage stuff of musicians I admire and this was a good example of that. The stories and stuff about his dad also help to make him more than "just a rock star". Well worth the money spent buying the book!
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 21 March 2018
A really disappointing & boring read
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 26 February 2014
Whilst I thoroughly enjoyed the band history and reading about the circumstances surrounding member changes and recording over the years I struggled with Rutherford's concept of juxtaposing his father's anecdotes and memories with those of his own. As described in the lyrics of the classic 'The Living Years' the relationship with his father was somewhat distant (if respectful) , whereas the relationship with his Genesis cohorts was a lot closer. Perhaps the two stories should have been told in different books.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 5 April 2017
Bought this as a gift for my son-in-law who was delighted with it.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 14 December 2014
Great insight into the history as nd workings of Genesis. I wish more band members would tell their stories so we can all feel what its like to be in a successful Prog rock band, this is a really good book ...
|0Comment|Report abuse