Learn more Download now Browse your favorite restaurants Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Learn more Learn more Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more



on 31 December 2013
I'd never really listened to Mazzy Star or any of Hope Sandovals' solo stuff but decided to take a punt on this on the strength of a track I really liked on a free compilation CD.

Initially I was a bit disappointed by the overall lethargy that pervades the album - it felt really one dimensional and lacking in ideas. However, this is one of those albums that rewards perseverance and repeated listens. I played it none stop for a couple of days by which time I realised that the album doesn't lack ideas, you just have to be in the right frame of mind to pick up on them. For me stand out tracks are On the Low and especially Feeling of Gaze which features really woozy sounding backward violins.

The obvious comparison is the quieter moments of the Velvets 3rd Album, however, once you get into this CD it is very uplifting and actually ended up reminding me of the nicer moments of late period Spacemen 3/early period Spiritualized.

I would recommend this for those that have the time and patience to do it justice.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 22 January 2017
Great albumn
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 10 August 2014
I have always liked Mazzy Star since my son played them to me, Hope's voice is really soothing and this is every bit as good as Mazzy Star
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 21 May 2014
Hope Sandoval's vocal style remains the same - dreamy, half spoken, ethereal. Guitars are slightly less to the fore than with Mazzy Star and the variety of instrumentation and sound is wider but otherwise fairly similar, hence if you like Mazzy Star you will probably like this.
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 4 February 2016
Great!
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 12 November 2001
Being a fan of Mazzy Star for quite a while, I was keen to hear Hope Sandoval's first solo outing (apart from the At The Doorway Again EP and the stuff with the Chemical Brothers and the Jesus and Mary Chain). I can tell you now that since I got this LP, nothing else has been on my cd player (and I have a big cd collection with [in my opinion] a lot of really good stuff in it).
Hope's voice is as deliciously narcotic as usual, at the same time languid and sorrowful, and if anything the tracks are even more laid-back than Mazzy Star... perfect music for any time, stone-cold chilled and sweeter than a kiss.
18 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 24 April 2010
In 2001 Hope Sandoval released an album under the banner Hope Sandoval and the Warm Inventions. Bizarrely, it was entitled Bavarian Fruit Bread and largely featured a collaboration with Colm O'Ciosoig, ex-drummer with the wonderful My Bloody Valentine. There's minimal percussion here though. The sound of the album, while not a major departure for Sandoval, was a lot more stripped back than Mazzy Star, featuring a lot more acoustic guitar and touches of cello, bells, harmonica and xylophone here and there. Hope sounds totally unenthused, but in an utterly bewitching way.

The album begins with Drop, a Jesus and Mary Chain cover (she used to go out with William Reid) and Hope's voice is centre stage over a strummed acoustic guitar. It's followed up by the narcoleptic Suzanne. This and Butterfly Mornings are perfect sunny Sunday morning music. On the Low picks up the pace a bit and reminds me slightly of less cringe-y Serge Gainsbourg (without the male vocals). Feeling of Gaze doesn't quite work. Hope's singing is great but the cello and piano competes rather than complements leaving the track sounding disjointed.

The stronger melodies are actually backweighted towards the second half of the album. Charlotte is another sleepily graceful track, while Clear Day is a quiet triumph. The vocals here are particularly enticing, lines like "gonna take all your troubles, gonna send them away"wouldn't work with other singers but they suit perfectly here. Around My Smile is probably the strongest track, a slow-burning torch song with Hope Sandoval at her most alluring. The chorus is like a ridiculous come-on, the line is "I got going on". Writing about it doesn't do it justice. The final track is an extended shoe-gazey type piece, Lose Me On The Way.

Avoid this album at all costs if you prefer rockier stuff or like your music to actually go anywhere.
One person found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 22 March 2007
Her wispy, soft vocals were the biggest highlight of Mazzy Star's smoky pop. But now that that much-missed band is gone, Hope Sandoval sets out as a solo artist, in the enchanting "Bavarian Fruit Bread." If you can't have Mazzy Star, then this is a pretty good alternative.

It opens with an acoustic guitar playing a slow melody, mellow and gently. That tune doesn't change much throughout the opening song "Drop," except that Sandoval begins singing in a moody, dreamy manner after a minute. That pretty much sets the tone for the entire album, except for a few songs -- sweet vocals, languid melodies, and a few chimes thrown in.

Most of the songs that follow are much the same -- mellow, gentle, sad acoustic ballads. A few break the mold, with an electric guitar riff in the smoldering "On The Low," and a distant piano solo in "Baby Let Me." And the final song "Lose Me On The Way" is a brilliant slice of experimental pop, slowly sliding from guitar to synth and haunted-house effects, and then back again.

"Bavarian Fruit Bread" is undoubtedly Sandoval's own effort, despite all the inevitable comparisons to her defunct band. It's prettier, less jazzy, more delicate, and simpler. And taken only on its own, it's still a remarkably pretty piece of indie folkpop.

Some of the acoustic guitar playing is somewhat weak, which becomes even clearer when the electric one enters the scene. It's far too simple. So, for that matter, is the songwriting ("Gonna find all your trouble/Gonna send them away/Gonna make you feel happy/Gonna be what you say"), although the songwriting's simplicity is something of a blessing.

However, the piano, eerie fuzzy synth, and slightly scratchy violin are well done, and add some extra dimension to the pretty little songs. Perhaps the only instrumental flaw is that Sandoval and her band never pick up the tempo. Everything is slow and languid. Why not a few midtempo songs?

But whatever the melodies are, they seem to exist to frame Sandoval's lovely voice. She puts it to good use here, singing as if she were half asleep. "The way you drop/Is like a stone/Making out you're flying/But you've just been thrown," she murmurs in the opening song. While these are very simple, they are also beautiful in their lack of pretension.

Stripped-down songs and airy melodies are at the heart of "Bavarian Fruit Bread," the solo debut by Hope Sandoval. Sweet and languid all around.
4 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on 1 April 2003
This is indeed ethereal music, but not quite in the sense that Enya for instance is ethereal. There is more of a eerie and haunted sound here, but there's exquisite beauty within that sound.
These are all good tracks, but most notable are "Suzanne", "On The Low", "Feeling Of Gaze", "Charlotte, "Clear Day", and "Around My Smile". There is a melancholy mood here, but not depressive as Natalie Merchant's MOTHERLAND might seem to many. This is meditative, relaxing music, and yet there is depth to it.
Highy recommended.
9 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERon 18 January 2006
Her wispy, soft vocals were the biggest highlight of Mazzy Star's smoky pop. But now that that much-missed band is gone, Hope Sandoval sets out as a solo artist, in the enchanting "Bavarian Fruit Bread." If you can't have Mazzy Star, then this is a pretty good alternative.

It opens with an acoustic guitar playing a slow melody, mellow and gently. That tune doesn't change much throughout the opening song "Drop," except that Sandoval begins singing in a moody, dreamy manner after a minute. That pretty much sets the tone for the entire album, except for a few songs -- sweet vocals, languid melodies, and a few chimes thrown in.

Most of the songs that follow are much the same -- mellow, gentle, sad acoustic ballads. A few break the mold, with an electric guitar riff in the smoldering "On The Low," and a distant piano solo in "Baby Let Me." And the final song "Lose Me On The Way" is a brilliant slice of experimental pop, slowly sliding from guitar to synth and haunted-house effects, and then back again.

"Bavarian Fruit Bread" is undoubtedly Sandoval's own effort, despite all the inevitable comparisons to her defunct band. It's prettier, less jazzy, more delicate, and simpler. And taken only on its own, it's still a remarkably pretty piece of indie folkpop.

Some of the acoustic guitar playing is somewhat weak, which becomes even clearer when the electric one enters the scene. It's far too simple. So, for that matter, is the songwriting ("Gonna find all your trouble/Gonna send them away/Gonna make you feel happy/Gonna be what you say"), although the songwriting's simplicity is something of a blessing.

However, the piano, eerie fuzzy synth, and slightly scratchy violin are well done, and add some extra dimension to the pretty little songs. Perhaps the only instrumental flaw is that Sandoval and her band never pick up the tempo. Everything is slow and languid. Why not a few midtempo songs?

But whatever the melodies are, they seem to exist to frame Sandoval's lovely voice. She puts it to good use here, singing as if she were half asleep. "The way you drop/Is like a stone/Making out you're flying/But you've just been thrown," she murmurs in the opening song. While these are very simple, they are also beautiful in their lack of pretension.

Stripped-down songs and airy melodies are at the heart of "Bavarian Fruit Bread," the solo debut by Hope Sandoval. Sweet and languid all around.
6 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse

Customers also viewed these items

Until the Hunter
£7.99
Through The Devil Softly
£8.99
Son of a Lady
£2.97

Need customer service? Click here