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4.6 out of 5 stars
12
4.6 out of 5 stars
Format: Kindle Edition|Change
Price:£0.99


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on 18 April 2017
Great novella that pretty much sums up the wonders of travelling and how it feels to see such incredible things in different countries/cultures!
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on 21 October 2013
I loved the FRUGALITY trilogy and didn't think for one minute that The Buddhas of Borneo would trump that, but guess what? It does.

This novella is pure beat. Ayris is up there with Kerouac and Ginsberg in my opinion, but it is how literary fiction is meant to be, not that pretentious let's see how many clever long words we can use / how many metaphors we can cram in.

The description of everything is second to none (the bats in the sky, wow, oh wow, oh wow - I was there too). Amazing work from an amazing author who is also one of the most beautiful people on the planet.

Read it. Now! You won't regret it.
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on 30 October 2013
This is a charming travel novella which vividly captures a trip to Borneo. Stuart,as ever, captures the moments in inimitable and beautiful style. The language that he uses to convey the amazing experiences is always lively; nods to Kerouac abound. The greatness of this book as a read is that you feel like you are there with him. The awe Stuart feels for the landscape as well as his affection for his two guides are both vivid and tangible. His night time trek through the jungle will be the stuff of my dreams for weeks to come.
Overall,this is a stunning read and I cannot recommend it highly enough.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 18 October 2013
This charming, magical, chaotic travelogue of a novella takes us with the author on his five day visit to Borneo. With a Stuart Ayris book, you are aware that you are reading his unique description of the place and events alongside the amazing things happening on the inside of his head. There are descriptions of places many of us will never see, alongside a conversation with a monitor lizard and a card game with the pygmy elephant from a picture on the wall. He describes the cave inhabited by clouds of bats, and from which the nests for the famous bird's nest soup are collected. He takes us to an old prisoner of war camp and he shows us the island where the female turtles come ashore to lay their eggs.

His writing is lyrical and creative, artfully constructed and layered in meaning. I love it when a writer can link together commonly used words and make me see something in a different way. This book can be read in a couple of evenings but the beguiling voice of the man who has not lost the child's eye view is going to remain with you.
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on 17 October 2013
Buddhas of Borneo is a lovely and captivating read that fans of the author's Tollesbury books will really enjoy. I don't know how he does it, but Stuart's books have a magical feel to them. He breaks all the rules and doesn't care. If he wants to slip in a poem, he does it, if he wants to morph two words together for poetic effect then he does and it WORKS.

Buddhas of Borneo is rich in poetic imagery, thoughts and feelings. This book is based on the author's experiences whilst travelling in the country but he allows his imagination to roam free on one or two flights of fancy. He conveys the depth of his feelings very well when he's at the war memorial. He shows his sense of wonder at some of the wildlife. His driver and tour guide are brought life with humour and heart.
This was an uplifting read that brought a smile to my lips, I expected nothing less from Stuart Ayris.
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on 10 February 2014
Five Stars, if not more.

This novella is a beautiful and eloquent response to a trip to Borneo. Sounds simple enough, but it is anything but.

As I have come to expect from Stuart Ayris, the use and structure of language is unique and unconventional, yet perfectly creates rich images in the mind. While both the turtles and the prisoner of war camp elements brought a lump to the throat, it is the language that wins out, blending blunt realism with flights of fancy.

The rhythms reminded me of Dylan Thomas at times, and I often feel compelled to read the words aloud.

I loved this first time around and have a feeling it will be re-read many more times in the future. Unpretentious, high class literature.
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on 30 March 2015
Wow!
What was that I have just read?
Was it a travelogue? Well yes but no. It was so much more.
Stuart Ayris tells a wonderful tale of his journey to Borneo, one where magic and joy engulf the pages, and when words can not describe this wonder Stuart literally creates new ones. The reader is gently placed there, looking over the writer's shoulder, or more often within his head, seeing a truly foreign land for the very first time.
There are moments of tear inducing poignancy, particularly when he visits the Concentration Camp from which the 'Death Marches' of WW2 commenced, I had to actually lay my kindle down for five minutes just to reflect following that particular chapter. The author's friendship with the two strangers who guide him is told in a way that explains little, yet makes perfect sense, it's all very clever (and clever in a good way).
Stuart's writing is almost poetic, well actually in places it is obviously poetic, thus allowing him to express the sheer joy of not just what he is seeing, but actually feeling.
I would thoroughly recommend 'The Buddhas of Borneo', it was a captivating read that on a rainy English day took me far away to a fantastic place I now feel I know a lot better.
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on 8 September 2015
I read this while in Borneo, partly because I like Ayris's writing and partly to 'get me in the mood' for the trip. As the book confirms, Borneo doesn’t need any help. It's a lovely book from a man who still retains that childlike sense of wonder. That probably makes him as rare as some of the species to be found in this part of the world and for similar reasons. Growth isn’t always a good thing.
It's a travelogue of sorts, documenting a trip to the Malaysian side of Borneo in the hands of his guide and driver, the Buddha's of the title, but Buddha's content, as all Buddha's are, to leave the real work of enlightenment to the traveller and the experience.
There's a very moving part about the world war 2 death marches which I read after a 'hard' shift in the humid sunshine. Never have I felt such a winey wimp.
But with Stuart Ayris it's as much about the writing as anything else, the flights of lyricism, gentle humour, bewilderment and joy… and he likes a drink. What's not to like.
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on 30 January 2014
I loved the Buddhas of Borneo and felt like I was on the journey myself. The descriptions of the places and people brought the whole book alive. It was a lighter more imaginative read and had me laughing and smiling along the way.I am now patiently awaiting the next book from Stuart and feel sure it will be just as amazing. I wish Stuart success and recognition for the future.
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on 17 May 2014
ok but the quirky writing style of song snippets and repeating words and making up words and
writing
only two
or three words on a line
just got so annoying that it spoiled the journey
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