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4.6 out of 5 stars
19
4.6 out of 5 stars


on 20 January 2004
For too long this superb record has been confined to the 'great but lost classic' files. The good news is it is once more freely available having just (late 2003) been re-released on Fledg'ling Records, P.O.Box 547, London SE26 4BD. Replete with four outtakes, fulsome liner notes by David Suff & John Tobler with additional personal reminisces courtesy of John Tams it's a landmark album every true folk-rocker should own. A heady mix of Traditional airs and original songs the album swings with great melodies, pin-sharp ensemble playing and rousing harmony singing. No wonder really when one realises that Albion stalwarts appearing on the record include founder member Ashley Hutchings on bass, his ex-Fairport cohorts Simon Nicol & Dave Mattacks, keyboard king Pete Bullock, fiddle ace Ric Sanders, wind instrumental virtuoso Phil Pickett, percussion man Michael Gregory and guitarists Graeme Taylor and Michael Gregory all ably supported by a veritable who's who of Seventies Folk-Rock: Richard Thompson, Kate McGarrigle, Linda Thompson, Martin Carthy, Julie Covington and ex-Amen Corner lead singer Andy Fairweather-Low. Most important of all and heading up this mighty crew was the one and only John Tams - at the time (1978) a relative newcomer. (As Ashley Hutchings graciously concedes in the liner notes - " 'Rise Up Like The Sun' has far more of John Tams's stamp on it than it has of mine, and he deserves far more credit for that album than I do.") Together with legendary record producer Joe Boyd, Tams was somehow able to keep the stellar cast of players firmly on task - staying within the moment of each song they fashioned a sublimely cohesive whole that has well stood the test of time. Tender, strong and true the original eight songs make for a heartfelt, muscular piece of music-making that resonates with genuine passion. Standout tracks include the cheekily humourous, immensely catchy 'Poor Old Horse', the wistfully beautiful 'Ampleforth/Lay Me Low' and the groundbreaking, epic interpretation of the Traditional broadside ballad, 'Gresford Disaster'. The latter track alone is worth the price of admission and opened the doors for others to follow including Tams' own Home Service. Only the twee bonus track 'Postman's Knock' requires skipping while everything else has endured to confirm 'Rise Up Like The Sun's' reputation as one of the all-time great UK Folk-Rock records up there with the transcendant 'Liege & Lief'.
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on 23 February 2004
From masterminding such folk classsics as Fairport Conventions Liege and Lief, Steeleye Spans Please to see the King as well as the seminal Morris On album and Shirley Collins No Roses, you'd have thought that Ashley Hutchings,one of the most important performers in the history of electric folk,would have rested on his laurels. But no, after a sabbatical in the mid seventies,he returned with a potent line up including ex fairporters Simon Nicol and Dave Mattacks,songwriter John tams, fiddle legend ric Sanders, Graham taylor on guitar and meidieval instrument specialist Phil Pickett amongst others, with guests like Richard and Linda Thompson, Martin carthy and Kate and Anna Maggarigle.
From John Tams opening call to arms 'Ragged Heroes' via the Richard Thompson classics 'Time to ring some changes' and 'Rainbow over the Hill' through adaptations of traditional material like the wonderful slow builder Poor Old Horse and the epic 10 min plus Gresford Mining Disaster, this band pull no punches and take no prisoners recording what was probably the last great folk rock album of the 70's, working tight but loose with the additional drumming of Michael gregory and the extra guitar of Graeme Taylor, this line up provided power and subtlety in equal measure, with a classic line up that couldn't be bettered. In fact this was the only studio album recorded by this line up,with the band splitting with Tams,Gregory and Taylor forming the Home Service, Nicol, Mattacks and Sanders reforming fairport Convention and Ashley Hutchings forming the first of a long line of albion bands.None however match the power of this line up, which created a classic album that should be spoken of in the same breath as Liege and Lief and Morris On.
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on 25 May 2005
This version of the Albion Band had been together for some time playing at the National Theatre in various productions. I remember when it was first released that a reviewer referred to it as "the perfect crossover album". That is, crossover between folk and rock. As well as the basic band various guests came in to add colour - people of real credibility like Martin Carthy and the McGarrigle Sisters. The result is unmistakeably English folk music, but is also raw and majestic, using the full force of electricity. "Gresford Disaster", for example, takes the hymn tune from "How Sweet The Name Of Jesus Sounds" and amplifies and extends it into something new. Try also "The Home Service" records - most of this band transmogrified into that group. Magnificent!
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on 12 June 2002
This version of the Albion Band had been together for some time playing at the National Theatre in various productions. I remember when it was first released that a reviewer referred to it as "the perfect crossover album". That is, crossover between folk and rock. As well as the basic band various guests came in to add colour - people of real credibility like Martin Carthy and the McGarrigle Sisters. The result is unmistakeably English folk music, but is also raw and majestic, using the full force of electricity. "Gresford Disaster", for example, takes the hymn tune from "How Sweet The Name Of Jesus Sounds" and amplifies and extends it into something new. Try also "The Home Service" records - most of this band transmogrified into that group. Magnificent!
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on 17 June 2004
The best "folk-rock" album since 'Leige & Leaf' - great songs, especially 'Time To Ring Some Changes' and 'The Gresford Disaster', brilliant playing and John Tams' voice in excellent form.
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on 8 January 2016
Maybe the greatest Folk Rock album ever? I could go out on a limb here and make that claim. The only, and I mean the only, reason not is the collective, rather than band, nature of the people on the recording. Had this just been a straight line-up, then I would compare it to Leige and Leaf. But it has guests aplenty, so I would half to place that as a justification for making it the second greatest. However, as much as Sandy claims the vocalist title for greatest female folk rock performance on Leige and Leaf, John Tams provides, for me, the greatest Folk Rock vocal performance for the males on Rise up like the Sun. His performance picked me up and carried me into the territory of Folk Rock, and that visitation has continued to this day. It was the Albion Band, therefore, that got me into Folk Rock in 1979, and that led to my being a regular at Cropredy and being a lifelong fan of the man we call Tam. Rock, Ballad, Morris, flagged electric violin, English brass band musings, mining disasters, and the cheeks of Sally's arse....they're all here!
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on 21 January 2014
Back to the '70s and a sound which was new but dated even then! No significant difference between this re-mastered disc and the original.
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on 4 October 2016
A superb album with great musicians playing great music - standout tracks are probably "Poor Old Horse" & "The Gresford Disaster", but my own favourite is "The Primrose", which for me is the ultimate "feel good" music".

If there's a better British folk- rock album around, I'd love to hear it
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on 26 March 2014
I fell in love with this album as a teenager, and I haven't found another folk rock album that lives up to the uniqueness and diversity. I simply love every track. Enjoy.
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on 9 January 2013
Great diversity of styles on this belter of an album and everyone one fine playing form.
One for lovers of British folk and folk rock.
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