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Customer reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
305
4.6 out of 5 stars
Days Are Gone (Deluxe Edition)
Format: MP3 Download|Change
Price:£9.99


on 21 June 2017
First saw Haim atGlastonbury. Just fantastic
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on 18 August 2014
Brilliant album and fast delivery :)
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on 2 October 2014
Fab album!
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on 2 August 2017
Great songs, talented Sisters.
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on 20 July 2014
Just wow! Awesome tracks with an 80s vibe to them.
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on 26 March 2017
Refreshing, talented.
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on 15 March 2017
Love it,thanks
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on 10 May 2014
Not the best album I've ever heard, but give "Days Are Gone" a few listens, and then it just clicks. There are, of course, songs that stand out and are much better than the rest ("Falling", "If I Could Change Your Mind" and "Days Are Gone" are the shining stars of the album, and, having bought the limited edition with 8 extra tracks/remixes, I would say don't bother, unless you are a hard-core fan). The album is bright and breezy pop sound (with a hint of rock), polished and chillaxing.

The sister-act rock band Haim are from the sunny LA, and you can almost feel the sunshine seeping through the album. The songs are sparkling, danceable and infectious, and this is a classic Haim sound. Yes, it is their first studio album, but Haim have been cultivating their sound for over fifteen years, and [some think] they are much better live than recorded. There are debates around the fact that Este, Danielle and Alana Haim let the producers rub the edges off their talent, and I agree. If you saw them on Jools Holland (or any other life performance) you can tell some of the momentous live energy has been lost in production of "Days Are Gone". But it does not make the album any less enjoyable and easy-listening.
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on 7 April 2014
I’m a sucker for that early ‘80s new wave blend of palm muting and power chords, so Haim provided a rather Fleetwood Mac-inspired breath of fresh air to the pop mainstream. The indie scene is crying out for axe-wielding rock chicks comparable to Stevie Nicks and Christine McVie, so Haim deserve some credit for having the cajones to drop the bomb that is Days Are Gone, an album which recalls the golden era of ‘80s pop rock.

From the ‘Vienna’-esque Ultravox pulse at the start of its opening track ‘Falling’, the Haim sisters hurl themselves into a maelstrom of new wave abandon from the Tango in the Night arpeggiated synths in the background of ‘The Wire’ to the breathy vocals of ‘Honey & I’. These girls are adept at crafting danceable pop songs with rhythms so tight that Quincy Jones would be hard-pressed to deny the similarities between the riff in ‘Forever’ and Michael Jackson’s ‘Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough.’

‘Don’t Save Me’ is a standout track showcasing Danielle Haim’s vocal hiccups and her ability to switch octaves down to little more than a murmur, and ’If I Could Change Your Mind’ shows that the girls are unafraid of trying on the pop formula for size without being branded as Pussycat Dolls, with ‘Days Are Gone’ itself hinting at the influence of contemporary R&B. However, it’s Este Haim’s peerless bass-playing which allow these influences to cohere firmly under the ‘pop rock’ genre.

In the same year which saw Fleetwood Mac reunite with Christine McVie at the London O2 Arena, it’s refreshing that Haim garnered critical recognition for taking sips from the same creative well of inspiration – in fact, if Haim open the door for more women to enter the music world to strum a guitar instead of ‘twerking’ to Robin Thicke then I think that can only be a good thing. Sure, the album may occasionally veer too close to Shania Twain territory at times, and it’s true that Haim do wear their musical influences on their sleeves, but the album remains a satisfying listen irrespective of this.

Their biggest crime? Cosying up to David Cameron on BBC1’s The Andrew Marr Show. Although, to be fair, Este Haim’s dedication of ‘The Wire’ to the Prime Minister by saying that it was all about him – a song which has lyrics ranging from ‘I’m bad at communication’, ‘it’s not right’ and ‘I fumbled it when it came down to the wire’ – may have been more rebellious than you’d think. But in spite of that incident of shameless political posturing, I’m willing to let it slide. After all, if women did less swinging around on a wrecking ball in their birthday clothes and followed Haim’s musical example, the BBC Radio 1 playlist would be an entirely different beast.
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on 15 August 2014
I came across Haim after hearing one of the tracks in the background on "Made In Chelsea". It's a bit like Cyndi Lauper, Kate Bush, Little Boots and La Roux all bundled up into one. One minute it's very fresh and modern, the next it has a kind of 80s retro-feel. Most of the tracks are catchy, with my favourite being "Go Slow". Definitely worth downloading, you will just keep playing it. Yes, it's probably a little over-produced when compared to their initial raw tracks when they were first discovered; but who cares, it works!
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