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on 18 January 2013
This documentary gives great insight into the personal lives of two absolutely fascinating women. The archive footage is beautiful. I highly recommend it to anybody interested in history.
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on 24 February 2013
This is a fascinating film exploring the lives and times of Ulrike Meinhof(founder of West Germany's Red Army Faction,dead by suicide in prison 1976)and Fusako Shigenobu(founder of Japan's Red Army,doing time in a Japanese jail when this film was made).It's made even more fascinating by being focused around their daughters,Bettina Rohl(abandoned by her mother in Sicily) and May Shigenobu (who was brought up in a sequence of Palestinian camps in Lebanon).
Great archive film,fascinating interviews and some painfully honest reflections-one Japanese revolutionary agreeing that revolution in Japan was impossible,Bettina Rohl's less than happy recollections of her mother.
well worth watching,especially at this price.
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on 17 August 2014
Irish writer and documentary director Shane O`Sullivan`s documentary feature which he produced, premiered at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam in 2010, was shot on locations in Japan and Germany and is a UK-Ireland co-production. It tells the story about a German Protestant Christian, journalist and co-founder of a West German underground organization called Red Army Faction (1970-1998) named Ulrike Meinhof (1934-1976), who was born in the interwar period in Oldenburg, Germany and during the German student movement in the late 1960s acquainted two militant activists named Gudrun Ensslin and Andreas Baader.

Distinctly and subtly directed by Irish filmmaker Shane O`Sullivan, this quietly paced documentary which is narrated from multiple viewpoints though mostly from the main interviewees` viewpoints, draws an informative and increasingly reflective portrayal of a Japanese author, guerrilla and founder and leader of a terrorist group called the Japanese Red Army (1971-2001) named Fusako Shigenobu who was born in the year that World War II ended in Tokyo, Japan. While notable for its atmospheric milieu depictions and reverent cinematography by cinematographers Bassem Fayad, Robin Probyn and Axel Schneppat, this narrative-driven story about radicalization leading to fanaticism and murder of both radicalized freedom fighters and civilians and how the lives of two daughters have been marred by the lives of their respectively militant and renowned mothers, depicts four interrelated studies of character and contains a great and timely score by composer Gilles Packham.

This historically biographical study from the early 2010s which is set in the late 20th and early 21st century in Germany and Japan and where a German daughter and journalist named Bettina Röhl and a Japanese daughter and journalist named May Shigenobu articulates their own and their parents` history with differing views on the political activism of their ancestors and their relation with them, is impelled and reinforced by its fragmented narrative structure, subtle continuity, diverse interviews and cinematic use of archival footage and photographs. An interactively conversational and demystifying documentary feature.
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on 13 March 2014
If you are interested in the historical period in the mid C20th then this documentary will enhance your understanding. Reported from the perspective reflected by the daughters of Meinhof (Bettina Rohl) and Shigenobu (May Shigenobu); the contrast could not be greater. Whilst Rohl disowns and distances herself from her mother, May Shigenobu, is clear about her love and admiration for her mother.

Referring specifically to Meinhof; the truth about what happend to the Baader Meinhof group remains unclear. For exemple, there are those who question Meinhof's suicide ..... was she executed?
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on 9 January 2014
Interesting documentary. Just a shame it gives the view off the daughter off Ulrike Meinhoff which isn't exactly pro-RAF and gives a very critical view off her mothers activities. Maybe not a bad thing but tought it was worth mentioning here.
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on 29 November 2014
Impressively shot with prior concrete research shown in depicting the issue ... An excellent piece to study the postmemory phenomenon of traumatic memories and collective historical consciousness.
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on 13 January 2017
Great insight, liked the interview with Wakamatsu
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on 1 October 2016
Good deliver product mediocre
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on 28 April 2013
Every revolutionary should watch this DVD, Every revolutionary should watch this DVD, Every revolutionary should watch this DVD, + 2words
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