Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
477
4.0 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 16 May 2017
95% of people won’t and don’t like this book – particularly if you are the type of person who needs to be on edge of a thrill to finish a book, or conversely want a relaxing read without fully engaging, or are easily put off by the fantastical. Self-select given this information.
100 years is a slow burner which requires constant brain engagement as it embeds its mature political and social commentary deep within a magical realism approach with a distinct Latin-American aroma. Re-reading pages allows you to absorb the imagery, whilst re-reading the book allows you to fully grasp some of the themes and Easter eggs laid by Marquez. Magical realism at its best, the novel immerses you into a world of necromancy, contagious insomnia plagues and thunderstorms of yellow flowers – (although the months of rain are more conceivable for UK readers).

Whilst clearly depressing in nature, the book flouts the acceptance of loss, of disaster and the eternal looping of time – ticking off all hallmarks of the tragicomedy of humankind. Marquez emphasises the narrative of a nationwide civil war, to its near destruction by greedy white industrialists, and through years of constant monsoon-like deluge with a distinct Latin-American style.

Some may find the repetition of names within the Buendia family excessively confusing – in my opinion it is useful in drawing attention to the shared collective fate of the protagonist (the whole family); individual characters taking a secondary role. One Hundred Years Of Solitude is worth reading for its imagery alone, but when so many human stories are threaded through as well, the novel transforms into a superb experience.

If you found this review helpful, please do rate it as helpful – really helps me out!
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 9 August 2015
I have had One Hundred Years Of Solitude on my kindle for nearly a year now, since I enjoyed losing myself in my first Gabriel Garcia Marquez novel, Love In The Time Of Cholera. One Hundred Years is equally as immersive a novel which tells the story of a remote South American village from its inception to its happy years, on through a nationwide civil war, to its near destruction by greedy white industralists, and through years of constant monsoon-like deluge. I love the huge scale of the story, especially as it is contained within a single small village and, a lot of the time, in one large house.

The extended Buendia family are the central pivot and their matriarch, Ursula, is a great character. She sees several generations live and die, stay near or travel away, and all named for the generation before which leads to incredible potential confusion for the reader. It seemed at times as though all the many male characters were named either Jose Arcadio or Aureliano! Initially I tried to remember the familial relationships of each as they were mentioned, but this became far too baffling so I instead just kept reading and found that discreet indications in the text allowed me to know about whom I was reading as I got to know the family better.

Marquez' knack for language and description is fabulous. I loved imagining the invasion of the schoolgirls, Aureliano playing the accordion at his parties, the Colonel becoming wearied of endless war, Melquiades continuing despite death, the old Jose tied to the tree, the candied animals and the little gold fishes, the gringos locked behind wire fencing in their chicken coop houses, the people becoming moss-covered in the endless rain. One Hundred Years Of Solitude is worth reading for its imagery alone, but when so many human stories are threaded through as well, the novel transforms into a superb experience.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 April 2017
A fantastical, allegorical, supernatural tale, born out of a bottomless well of creativity and imagination. Marquez's re-use of the same names throughout the generations of the Buendia family and its offshoots, gives the story a dizzying, bewildering quality, which serves to disorientate and detach you from place and time. So much so that the end, when it comes, catches you off guard and takes you by surprise. I laughed out loud at the conceit of it. Unique.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 April 2017
A timeless classic which all should ready. The comedy in it is outstanding. I bought it on the kindle so I could re-read it after 30 years and it is still as good. Hopefully I can ready it in another 30.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 May 2017
Life is too short to suffer through this book. Still don't understand how I read half of it, but that's where it ends for me.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 April 2017
I just couldn't get into it. No characterisation so couldn't remember who was who. Gave up in the end.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 May 2017
Translated almost directly, it is childlike to read, and quite long winded. Not a page turner.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 15 March 2017
Beautiful book, couldn't put it down. Fantastic storytelling finished the book wishing the characters and small town actually existed.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 2 May 2017
Classic.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 10 May 2017
I have read this book at least 3 times and I'm sure that won't be the last. I simply love it!
I recommend 100%
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Questions? Get fast answers from reviewers

Please make sure that you've entered a valid question. You can edit your question or post anyway.
Please enter a question.

Customers also viewed these items


Need customer service? Click here

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)