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on 12 December 2017
To paraphrase one of the blurbs :

'A splendid and, more important, an amusing book on English grammar”

This raises the question (not discussed in the book) as to why writers feel the need to add -ly to 'important', which is a perfectly good adverb as it stands. Not to mention what appears to be a missing indefinite article, and a quirky use of 'sane'. I don't think I would ever buy an “insane” book of any sort. However, you can't judge a book by its cover blurbs.
A grammar book of 280 or so pages cannot hope to be comprehensive but this one covers a wide area. I should like to have seen a discussion of the much abused 'ilk' along with misuse of 'begs the question' (although in defence of those who misuse either, the opportunity to apply them accurately might occur somewhat less than once in a lifetime).
Rather more surprising is the omission of any mention of the universal propensity to replace the present participle with a kind of unintended passive. “I was sat at the table; stood on the corner etc”, well, yes if some agency sat or stood you in that position. Otherwise “sitting” or “standing” seem preferable. Similarly, use of “sorted” as synonymous with “solved” has crept in (almost) unnoticed. “sorted” used to mean “arranged in order” eg alphabetical or numerical. I would suggest “sorting out” but not to East Enders script writers. If other people are involved “sorting out” may well involve a degree of violence.
There is also discussion of how to avoid ambiguity, though the quotation from Judges 12: 5-6 leaves us to decide whether “forty and two thousand” means 42,000 or 2,040. 42,000 seems an awful lot of dead Ephraimites – but it's what my New English Bible gives.
Amusing and crafted with a light touch – it had me reaching for my Compleet Molesworth (which I hadn't opened in ages) and Ronald Searle's wonderful drawings of the Private Life of the Gerund.

It also persuaded me to buy a couple of other grammar books, some serious and some less so. In brief, I liked it.
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on 12 January 2015
This is an entertaining and informative book on a fascinating subject, written by someone who knows grammar well and obviously has a high regard for it. It is unfortunate that, after Chapter 7, the book becomes a vehicle for the author's political views; if you are not a card-carrying member of the left wing of the Labour party, firmly wedded to AGW and political correctness, you might be better off looking elsewhere for enlightenment.
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on 17 August 2017
How can a book about English grammar be so entertaining as well as informative. David Marsh has done such a good job in writing this that I might have to read it all over again, just for fun.
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on 20 July 2015
Any parent or teacher anxious for their offspring to have a decent command of our language, rather than a diluted short hand speak of social media, should make this compulsory reading, just to reveal how adulterated and misused (abused?) English is, in all its beauty and richness.
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on 14 June 2015
An author with an extensive knowledge of English Grammar and a very sharp sense of humour. He makes dry grammar interesting and funny. I appreciated the wit as much as the education. This book would be appreciated in most 6th form English departments.
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on 9 January 2014
Thank you Amazon for a speedy delivery as always.

I love this book because it teaches grammar in a very cleaver way, at least for me. Through the words of some of the most famous songs. This tactic made me keep reading, contrary to other grammar books where I left it after the first couple of pages.
The twitter questions and answers are stupendous, I already found a few mistakes of my own.

Thank you to David Marsh for this great book, and to Amazon for the excellent Customer service.
Elena
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on 21 October 2014
Excellent book. I have just started a CELTA course and could not make head nor tail of the official course set text. So i read this instead and suddenly it makes sense. I took it to class and showed it to my classmates (and in one exercise used this book to get the answer) and I think I have made some extra sales for David Marsh. And anyone who explains the rules of syntax using song titles is about my level!
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on 3 March 2015
Very pleased with purchase. As described. Many thanks
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on 23 January 2015
Haven't read it in detail but looked at a hard copy before buying the kindle version. I think that the hard copy version is probably easier to read and dip into than the kindle version.
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on 19 March 2015
Informative and entertaining.
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