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4.6 out of 5 stars
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 26 June 2017
Watching this was a real treat, there is something about the Cybermen that the later redesigns lacked, they are really menacing, no wonder kids hid behind the sofa!
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Grandson decided to get all the Dr. Who series. He's a self-professed nerd and totally happy with these dvd's.
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on 16 August 2017
Excellent. A hard to find DVD.
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on 3 November 2015
I really enjoyed this. I remember watching it as a kid and was very spooked at the time. Brought back a lot of nostalgic memories.
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on 17 August 2017
This was purchased as a gift for a friend-They are delighted with it!
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on 11 October 2013
The Tenth Planet is a key story in the history of Doctor Who. It marks the departure of the original Doctor, William Hartnell, introduces the Cybermen and it is the first "base under siege" story, which would prove to be a staple of the Troughton era, particularly during season 5.

Although they would go on to menace the Doctor right up to the present day, it appears that the Cybermen were created purely as a one-off menace. Visually, of course, they are totally different from their later appearances - with their human hands, cloth covered faces and sing-song voices. On the one hand they look ridiculous, but on the other they are chilling in a way that no other Cybermen would ever be.

Soon, the Cybermen would be just another monster, their only goals being conquest and power. But in The Tenth Planet they merely want to survive - and if that means draining all the energy from the Earth in order to replenish their own planet, Mondas, then that's what they'll do. To them, this is logical, particularly if they can take the humans back to their planet and convert them into Cybermen. Why would anyone object to a life free from pain and disease? Certainly the Cybermen can't think of a reason, but the Doctor and his friends can.

Although William Hartnell didn't want to leave the show, his failing health sadly meant that there wasn't really any alternative. Indeed, a bout of illness meant that he had to be written out of episode 3 at very short notice, a particular problem given Doctor Who's treadmill-like year long production schedule.

But whatever his health issues or his feelings on leaving the part he loved, Hartnell is never anything but totally professional and rock solid. His confrontations with the Cybermen and General Cutler are particular highlights and his new companions, Ben and Polly (Michael Craze and Anneke Wills), provide him with good support.

Although the structure of the story is a little odd - the Cybermen arrive, go away for an episode, come back and then are defeated a little easily - The Tenth Planet, apart from the importance it holds in the history of Doctor Who, is a strong story in its own right, directed with assurance by Derek Martinus.

With the fourth and final episode missing since the 1970's, Planet 55 have re-created it via animation. Their work on Reign of Terror was a little controversial, but this works better and should gain more widespread approval as unlike Reign it sticks more closely to what the episode could have looked like. It's a very impressive effort with some good visual touches.

Toby Hadoke moderates with his usual skill and good-humour the commentary on episodes 1-3 (no commentary on episode 4). Joining him are Anneke Wills (Polly) and designer Peter Kindred, with a generous number of guest actors from the story - Christopher Matthews, Earl Cameron, Alan White, Donald Van Der Maaten and Christopher Dunham. Given that this story was made nearly fifty years ago, it's lovely to have so many participants on this one, particularly Anneke Wills whose love and affection for both the series, and her co-star, the late Michael Craze, still shines brightly.

Elsewhere, there's the Episode 4 telesnap reconstruction that was included on the VHS release. It may have been somewhat superseded by the animation, but it's still nice to have it included. The making of documentary - Frozen Out - has plenty of ground to cover, and is a good watch with Anneke Wills, amongst others, on hand with some interesting anecdotes. The thorny topic of Hartnell's difficult behaviour - both his racist attitudes and his general irritability - isn't shied away from, and there's also some interesting info on how the production coped with a Doctor-shaped hole in episode 3.

There's more of Anneke Wills on Doctor Who stories, which is culled from interview material shot in 2003 for The Story of Doctor Who documentary. Although it's quite short - at around 13 minutes - Wills' joy and enthusiasm make it another treat. She's been sadly under-represented on the DVDs due to the lack of surviving episodes from her time on the show, but with both The Moonbase and The Underwater Menace to come next year, I'm looking forward to spending more time in the company of Ms Wills.

Boys! Boys! Boys! sees Peter Purves, Frazer Hines and Mark Strickson chat about their experiences on the show, and is a jolly little programme. It's a pity that Strickson couldn't have been in the studio with Purves and Hines (instead he appears by satellite) but it's still a very amusing watch as Purves and Hines, in particular, bounce off each other very well.

There's another couple of documentaries, Companion Piece and The Golden Age, a nice piece of archive footage from a 1973 edition of Blue Peter, the usual Photo Gallery and PDF materials, which leaves one more little gem on this DVD - an interview with William Hartnell shot shortly after he left Doctor Who.

Filmed in his dressing room whilst preparing for a panto appearance, at times the short interview finds him in a prickly mood, dismissing pantomime as not being "legitimate theatre" for example. This is the only on-screen Hartnell interview that exists and it was only recently rediscovered - and it's wonderful to have a brief glimpse of Hartnell, the man.

So not only is The Tenth Planet a very solid story it also has a high quality package of special features that make this DVD a must buy.
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on 12 June 2015
The final missing episode is now animated. Great improvement over the VHS release. Full of extras.
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on 18 November 2013
A very important story for obvious historical reasons; last Hartnell, 1st Cyberman story, the beginning of the Kit Pedler/Gerry Davis writing partnership & 1st regeneration. Is it a good debut for the Cybermen and a good finale for the Billster? To be honest; yes.. and no.
Pedler and Davis (both misspelled for an episode each in the opening credits)delivered a good script with a large flaw but many virtues. The tardis crew turn up at space tracking station at the South Pole (its icy wastes well created for studio and over 40 years ago) just before the appearance of a new planet from which the Cybermen arrive.
Davis the old school dramatist always believed the companions should get a lot to do and go off on their own away from the Doctor at significant moments in the story. This proved to be a virtue given Hartnell's health (absent for an episode) necessitating a rewrite. Polly gets to be the main moral voice of the story berating both Warhorse commander Cutler and the Cybermen as the occasion commands. Anneke Wills does all this brilliantly and really sells it.
Ben played by Michael Craze gets to work out how the Cybermen might be tackled and if you've never particularly noticed Craze's acting before then watch the excellent moment where he conveys disgust at having to kill a cyberman!
A great debut for the Cybermen are characterised here better than in any other story since. They are not belligerent do-badders but they just no longer have or understand emotion.
They are a lot more logical than in some appearances. They offer to save the humans from Earth's expected destruction by taking them back to their planet Mondas but are not going to force them. It will not affect their plans so they let the base crew converse with some doomed astronauts and as Polly berates them for not caring they retort;
"there are people dying all over your world yet you do not care for them!"
How many other scripts give the Cybermen a retort like that?
Now they may look naff in photos but they tower over everyone and are much more impressive moving about onscreen. The only downside is in an attempt to sound inhuman they are given voices that sound Swedish and do not create the menace intended!
FYI the trait associated with 80' stories-vulnerability to their own weapons, actually begins here.
The Cybermen show why Pedler was such a find for Who. He knew a lot of real science & could successfully blend it with a strong imagination e.g. the organic part of the Cybermen is stated here to be their brain which seems plausible but their planet is a twin planet to Earth which is pure SF imagination. He also had a sense of humour nodding at real scientific achievements good and bad by going to the opposite end of the aphabet e.g. Zeus missions instead of Apollo ones and a Z bomb instead of an A Bomb
A good base set looking nice & functional and a the guest cast has 2 standouts- Robert Beatty as the ultra ruthless Cutler and David Doddimead as the sensitive scientist Barclay. Watch also for the marvellous Steve Plytas making a lot out of a small role with Secretary Wigner.
For William Hartnell it's not the best of finale's for a couple of reasons. 1) the Doctor's role and that of his companions is important but not central they have to keep things from escalating as the main threat resolves itself. For spoiler's sakes I won't go into detail but the resolution is a big flaw in an otherwise enjoyable story. 2) This was no one's fault but due to his health he wasn't able to give a strong performance although he does manage a few good moments- asking where their emotions are is one.
The restoration work is again good, I'd never noticed you can just about make out the eyes of the Cybermen actors when I had it one VHS for example.
The same crew who animated 2 eps of Reign of Terror did episode 4 where they were able to be guided by the telesnaps ( check out the telesnap and soundtrack reconstruction made for the VHS release among the extras which also includes some filmed of the telly moments). As a result this is a much better reconstruction combining the facial expressions I believe added a lot to Reign with cutting more suited to the time this was originally made. It's improved the story no end.
The commentary with main contributor Anneke Wills amongst others-notably the 2 doomed astronauts is a good one. Earl Cammeron remembers how comfortable the spacesuits were and Anneke remembers the problems of trying to look cold in fur coat in a hot studio. Shame there is no commentary for ep4.
Frozen Out is a top notch making of doc. Anneke again is the star. She remembers the excitement of Kit Pedler ("A real scientist"), hiow the regeneration went and be warned makes no bones about Hartnell's irascibility and bigotry! Reg Whitehead is wonderfully proud of being the 1st Cyberman "others will say it's them but is isn't!"
Also the original vision mixer tells us how the 1st regenration was done with the help of animation from Quiros (Ice Warriors).
Companion piece is a free ranging look at the companion role with some classic who companions and Arthur Darvill plus some professional fans turned writers (they actually have the most interesting things to say!)
Boys, Boys Boys is the male version of the previous girls features with Peter Purves, Frazer Hines and by satellite Mark Strickson. They're all fun but Frazer is especially entertaining.
There's also some Blue Peter stuff which I think featured on the 3 Doctors releases.
I shamefully neglected to mention this when I first posted the review but there's also a rare interview with William Hartnell(*1), yes a rare opportunity to hear him speak as himself not in character. This is backstage at a pantomime he did not long after leaving Who. It starts part of the way through a discussion about Daleks ( it's explained what we get is all that remains) which Hartnell admits are difficult to work with. It's clear he wasn't thrilled to be in a pantomime and the interviewer failed to make much of a rapport with him. A good insight anyway as Hartnell tactlessly distinguishes between pantomime and "legitimate" acting, makes it clear how much he values an agent ("the last thing I want to do is talk turkey"), says he was a good singer in his youth and has no interest in dancing (interesting in light of Reg Whitehead's memory of him tap dancing in "frozen out")plus had no fears of type casting. A bit of gold dust.
I also shamefully neglected Anneke Will's Doctor Who Stories interview. She recalls enjoying her time on the show and here there are several stories you may have heard before but as ever charmingly told but also less well known anecdotes like her being on a bridge over a canal as a boat passed under occupants shouting for "Polly" to join their party!
Dominic Sandbrook's Golden Age looks at whether there was any such thing as a golden age for the Police Box Show. Of course there isn't e.g., my golden age is Tom Baker's 1st 3 years but it may not be yours. The topic is quite well explored even if the feature could have been a little longer.
An enjoyable story with a packed set of extras, recommended highly.

*1 recently rediscovered pop over to the BBC Radio 4 website to listen to the Billster's appearance on desert Island Discs
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on 1 May 2017
great
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VINE VOICEon 7 January 2014
Fans have waited years for this four episode set. Episode 3 is still missing and believed lost forever so it has been animated an matched with the original audio recording. This is a good result and it enables the whole story to be watched in its intended glory.

This is particularly special as it is the first outing of the Cybermen, and the last story featuring William Hartnell. Episode 4 features the first ever regeneration and for that reason alone this is a collectors item. A second DVD is included in the set packed full of special features.

This story was one I originally remember watching from behind the settee and unlike some it has kept its fear factor reasonably well. The setting in snow has made it very easy to keep the suspense.

An excellent Dr Who adventure!
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