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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 14 September 2013
Let It Snow is three short stories by three bestselling authors that are pieced seamlessly together to create one fantastic Christmas tale. The first part of the story is written by Maureen Johnson, an author that I have never read before, but her writing is very similar to John Green's. Her story is a brilliant opener for this book and it had me gripped right away. Her writing is very funny and I felt like a teenage girl was actually talking to me as I read her story. I found it very easy to relate to Jubilee who is the sort of girl that I would love to be friends with in real life. Although she can be quite shy and doesn't realise that her boyfriend is treating her like cr*p, she is also quite a strong character and you see her develop, with the help of Stuart, throughout this short story. This story definitely could've been a great success as a standalone story and I wish that there had been enough space for Maureen Johnson to write even more about Jubilee and Stuart because I would love to know how their story ends.

The second section by John Green is without a doubt the best part of the novel. His story is the classic tale of two really old friends who've known each other since they were babies but have developed feelings for each other as they've grown older. John Green has this magical ability to put into words exactly how a teenager feels. Despite the fact that the story of friends becoming lovers has been retold time and time again, his story was so much more special because the emotions felt real. This story compliments is written from the perspective of a teenage boy, as opposed to a girl, so it compliments the first story nicely as you get teenage romance from two different perspectives. This story is also incredibly funny as well as heartbreaking - just like all of John Green's other novels - and I found myself laughing out loud but also holding back tears at some points.

The third section, written by Lauren Myracle, is what turned this from a five star book to a four star book. This section is written from the point of view of a Addie, an incredibly self-absorbed and whiny girl who really just annoyed me. I guess this story was supposed to be about how Addie realises how selfish she has been and changes right before Christmas but she really was far too annoying for me to sympathise with her at all. This section is where all the different strands of the story come together and you see how all the characters that you've already met in the previous two sections know each other. There were lots of names flying around this section and I had to keep flicking back through the previous two stories to figure out who was who and what their relationship to everybody else was. This made me awfully confused and meant that I couldn't really enjoy the story as I spent too much time thinking and trying to piece everything together. The ending of the story was a little disappointing and you don't get a real wrap for any of the three stories, you just get to the point where they all meet each other and piece together what's happened to all of them over the past few days. This is a great shame and I was left wanting more. Much more.

All in all, this is a fantastic teen read that is perfect for Christmas. Fans of John Green will lap up this novel, particularly the middle section; however, prepare to be a little disappointed by the last section. I almost wish that this novel had actually been split into three separate books so that each author could've spent more time developing the relationships between each pair. If you're looking for three short and sweet Christmas romances then this is definitely the book for you. If you're someone who gets really, really annoyed when a story isn't quite finished, then perhaps this isn't the book for you.

http://whats--hot.blogspot.com
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 14 September 2013
Let It Snow is three short stories by three bestselling authors that are pieced seamlessly together to create one fantastic Christmas tale. The first part of the story is written by Maureen Johnson, an author that I have never read before, but her writing is very similar to John Green's. Her story is a brilliant opener for this book and it had me gripped right away. Her writing is very funny and I felt like a teenage girl was actually talking to me as I read her story. I found it very easy to relate to Jubilee who is the sort of girl that I would love to be friends with in real life. Although she can be quite shy and doesn't realise that her boyfriend is treating her like cr*p, she is also quite a strong character and you see her develop, with the help of Stuart, throughout this short story. This story definitely could've been a great success as a standalone story and I wish that there had been enough space for Maureen Johnson to write even more about Jubilee and Stuart because I would love to know how their story ends.

The second section by John Green is without a doubt the best part of the novel. His story is the classic tale of two really old friends who've known each other since they were babies but have developed feelings for each other as they've grown older. John Green has this magical ability to put into words exactly how a teenager feels. Despite the fact that the story of friends becoming lovers has been retold time and time again, his story was so much more special because the emotions felt real. This story compliments is written from the perspective of a teenage boy, as opposed to a girl, so it compliments the first story nicely as you get teenage romance from two different perspectives. This story is also incredibly funny as well as heartbreaking - just like all of John Green's other novels - and I found myself laughing out loud but also holding back tears at some points.

The third section, written by Lauren Myracle, is what turned this from a five star book to a four star book. This section is written from the point of view of a Addie, an incredibly self-absorbed and whiny girl who really just annoyed me. I guess this story was supposed to be about how Addie realises how selfish she has been and changes right before Christmas but she really was far too annoying for me to sympathise with her at all. This section is where all the different strands of the story come together and you see how all the characters that you've already met in the previous two sections know each other. There were lots of names flying around this section and I had to keep flicking back through the previous two stories to figure out who was who and what their relationship to everybody else was. This made me awfully confused and meant that I couldn't really enjoy the story as I spent too much time thinking and trying to piece everything together. The ending of the story was a little disappointing and you don't get a real wrap for any of the three stories, you just get to the point where they all meet each other and piece together what's happened to all of them over the past few days. This is a great shame and I was left wanting more. Much more.

All in all, this is a fantastic teen read that is perfect for Christmas. Fans of John Green will lap up this novel, particularly the middle section; however, prepare to be a little disappointed by the last section. I almost wish that this novel had actually been split into three separate books so that each author could've spent more time developing the relationships between each pair. If you're looking for three short and sweet Christmas romances then this is definitely the book for you. If you're someone who gets really, really annoyed when a story isn't quite finished, then perhaps this isn't the book for you.

http://whats--hot.blogspot.com
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on 21 May 2014
I bought this for my twelve-year old daughter and read it before I gave it to her. I had only read the author John Green before this book and found that the three authors have similar styles so the short stories blend well into one another. Like all of John Green's books, the writing in all three stories is quick, intelligent and achingly knowing. There are points when you wonder whether teenagers not only think this way today, but also verbalize it so well. I don't remember having so much self-knowledge when I was a teenager.
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on 17 December 2015
Ah this book is so cute, and while it's a Christmas read I have a feeling it's the sort of book that could be read any time of year.

The Jubilee Express

It took me a while to warm up to this story, and therefore the book as a whole, as Jubilee is definitely the kind of character that you have to warm up. I found her a little bit self-righteous and annoying at first and to be honest, I didn't actually overly like her by the end of the story. The story itself was just so cute. I loved the backstory with the little Christmas village and Stuart's mom and just her over-momness. I didn't really get why Jubilee's parents decided it was safer for er to ravel across the county alone in the middle of a storm rather than waiting at home or in her boyfriends where she would be safe and neighbours could help if she needed but I guess, then there would be no story!

A Cheertastic Christmas Miracle

Everything about this book was so John Green. From the geeky and clever male character to his dorky friends with weird nicknames and catchphrases. I probably liked this the least out of the stories as I could kind of see where it was going in the love-relationship sense. I also just found it totally...sad...that guys would want to get up in the middle of Christmas Eve and travel miles across the ice and snow just because a bunch of cheerleaders are in a Waffle House. There was something about the whole thing that left a bitter taste in my mouth, though the journey turned into more of an adventure for the sake of it rather than just the cheerleaders but still. I love how Stuart's break-up story was mentioned off-hand in this story, and then again in the third story. I love overlaps like that.

The Patron Saint of Pigs

This is a story I definitely liked purely for the story and not the character because she was so annoying and, as her friends told her, so self absorbed. But it was interesting to read from a character like Addie as I don't think she's a character that gets written about, or at least that I have read about, too much. She was a little bit like a cheerleader stereotype except she wasn't actually a cheerleader. I really loved her friends, they were the saving grace of the book. I loved how supportive they were but at the same time they were able to tell Addie some home truths. I really loved the end when all the characters ended up in the same place and all i could think and picture was HOW AMAZING this book would be as a movie - a movie that jumped from one story to the next until they just all join up together in a Love Actually/ Valentine's Day kind of way. It needs to happen. I need it to happen. Who do I call?
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on 3 January 2011
I'm not generally a fan of short stories, but I am a big fan of the holiday season. I'm also a fan of Maureen Johnson, John Green and Lauren Myracle, the three authors behind Let It Snow, a collection of festive-themed romances. And while the three stories in Let It Snow are shorter than full-length novels, they're not short short. They're also linked by the fact that the majority of the action takes place in the same small town in the middle of a snowstorm, and by recurring characters, in-jokes and references, making Let It Snow a little more satisfying as a whole than other short story collections I've read.

First up is Maureen Johnson's story, The Jubilee Express, which comes to us courtesy of narrator Jubilee Dougal. Forced to miss her boyfriend's Christmas smorgasboard and catch a train to visit her grandparents for the holidays when her parents are arrested at a shopping riot, Jubilee finds herself stranded in snowy Gracetown in a carriage full of squealy cheerleaders. As you'd imagine from that last sentence, this is a quirky and sometimes over-the-top tale that borders on insanity. It's also hilarious, heartwarming, and über-Christmassy. I loved it, and could quite happily have read an entire novel narrated by wry and witty Jubilee.

The second story is John Green's A Cheertastic Christmas Miracle, which sees narrator Tobin and his friends braving the blizzard in a race against time to reach Gracetown's Waffle House, where the squealy cheerleaders from the previous story are taking shelter for the night. It's a little bit zany and a lot funny, with a super romantic twist that more than redeems Tobin from his early cheerleader-chasing shallowness. If you like your humour with a side-order of slapstick, you'll probably like this one.

Lauren Myracle's story, The Patron Saint of Pigs, focuses on newly pink-haired Addie, a barista at Starbucks who is having some major relationship woes. She's recently broken up with her boyfriend of one year, who just so happens to have made walk on appearances in the previous two stories in the collection, and she's about to learn a major life lesson - with a little help from an old lady and a teacup piglet, that is. While this story feels a little more tame than the others, it's an adorable and heartwarming read which also references my all-time favourite Christmas movie, It's A Wonderful Life.

Let It Snow is the book equivalent of a gingerbread latte with whipped cream and sprinkles. It's delicious and Christmassy and probably best consumed when it's cold outside. Each story is pleasingly unique, and yet as a whole the collection stays true to the spirit of this holiday. If you're looking for something to get you in the Christmas spirit, this could well be it.
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on 15 January 2015
This book is difficult to rate as I preferred one novella over the other two. Though as a whole, it has to be a three star.

The Jubilee Express by Maureen Johnson was my favourite, by a mile to say the least. It was fun, quirky and how could you not love Jubilee? This novella was the best written of the three and makes you smile from the start.

A Cheertastic Christmas Miracle is the second novella by John Green. This novella has the same classic writing style that John usually uses in his books. Though I don't think this is as good as what he usually writes, and think some if his other work is a lot better than this one. I think the reason for this though, is that it's shorter than all of his other books, so I feel he was rushed with this novella.

The Patron Saint Of Pigs is the third novella by Lauren Myracle. This one wasn't too bad, but I think it was forced and rather rushed. It lacked the depth, quirkiness and overall feel that the first story had. There was also too much quoting and likeness to It's A Wonderful Life, and I didn't that aspect.

I did like how the stories were connected together, and that overall it was good, but because I feel the stories progressively got worse, I can only give this a 3 star review (I can only apologise to John Green as he is awesome).
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on 7 January 2012
Okay, so I'm a fifteen year old male. It took me a few days of pondering whether to get this book or not because, as we can see, it's a book about romance. And some of the reviews written mention how it'd be a good book for girls, so I was quite doubting.
But this book was amazing. It wasn't just three holiday romances; it's three romances that are extremely interconnected with every character having purpose and story. The end of the story brings them all together tighter than ever, and it's something so delightful and christmassy, and it's great.
This can be read at any type of year really , but it's a real treat just before christmas. Alas, I bought it a few days after, but hey. It's a great , moving book. Well done.
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VINE VOICEon 30 December 2011
Let it Snow is a great reading companion for the holiday season, especially if you're looking to feel more immersed in the Christmas spirit. It also makes a really lovely gift with the added bonus that if you're not too sure about one or two of the authors/stories, there are three to go on!

Personally, I was drawn to this compilation because John Green was involved. I'd never heard of either Maureen Johnson or Lauren Myracle, but I think the short stories/novellas they contributed to Let it Snow are tantalizing introductions to their work, and I'll be sure to check out their other books when I have the time.

This book does not overstay its welcome, with each story coming in at around 100 pages and the steady pace maintained by concise chapters which take nice little bites out of each narrative. It would be a nice prelude to Christmas Day to really get you into the spirit, but I ended up devouring it on Boxing Day and the festivity was not lost.

Okay, now that we've got all the boring technical stuff out of the way, I'll tell you a bit about the individual stories:

The Jubilee Express by Maureen Johnson - A really dazzling first story and hard to live up to. I didn't expect to love this as much as I did. There is no fussing around, this story just goes bang! and starts. Sympathetic characterization, witty dialogue, totally immersive settings, a quirky and ultimately touching storyline! I can't put my finger on why, but I think this was my favourite out of the three stories :).

A Cheertastic Christmas Miracle by John Green - If you're a fan of this amazing author's work I won't have to tell you that the characters are creative, realistic, sympathetic, laugh-out-loud funny and totally jump off the page! The chemistry is magical. The stakes are continually raised and the tension is strangely electric as the characters race to be first at the Waffle House. I loved the fact that it was like an adventure story in that the destination was determined early on but the majority of the story was concerned with actually journeying there. This one did actually bring a fuzzy-warm tear to my eye :).

The Patron Saint of Pigs by Lauren Myracle - I'm going to be honest, for the first few pages of this story I felt bitter. But that's because I didn't get it. First of all, the protagonist is not immediately sympathetic, but that is the whole point of the story, and so what this ends up being is actually the most classic of the Christmas tales in Let it Snow, harking back to holiday favourites such as Scrooge. Second of all, I didn't really know where the plot was going (or even where it WAS) until quite late on. The first part of the story is mostly concerned with the protagonist moping around about her ex-boyfriend and it's not until the eponymous pig is mentioned that the plot actually raises its head and shakes the snow off, but then you realise it's been there all along. It's just been...sleeping. Or rather, overshadowed by the protagonist's egocentricity, which is a pivotal theme in the story. SO, to sum up, if you bear with this last story all will become clear and you'll be left feeling very warm and fuzzy indeed :). Also: I now totally want a teacup piglet called Gabriel. I dare you not to melt over the mention of this little guy.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed Let it Snow for what it is: pure festive confectionery! I loved how all of the stories interconnected and came back together at the end; it made it all the more Christmassy, and reminded me a little of Love Actually. I think John Green's contribution with its male viewpoint tempers what *could* have been an overly fluffy piece of candyfloss whose sweetness actually diminishes the impact rather than heightens it. But his piece is flanked on both sides by two truly wonderful Christmas stories! One to be pulled off the shelf and read every Christmas, for sure :). Tug on your Christmas sweats, hunker down in front of the fire with some hot chocolate and rocky road, and enjoy :)!

Highly recommended!
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 5 February 2016
I just blazed through this. I got it out of the library, intending (in January, so there was a chance!) of saving it for a snowy/icy/seasonal day's weather and then sitting down with it and feeling 'wintry'. But the weather wasn't playing ball and once I'd started, I was going to get through the whole book.

It's a lovely read, probably even better on a snowy day, but it had a Christmas glow feeling about it (even in January). A collaboration by three YA authors, each story tells of a different couple/relationship that connects with those that have come before it, in a small snowed in town on Christmas Eve.

As you'd expect from the genre, we have teenagers who have fought, some who are just meeting (some lovely 'meet cute' scenes), some who initially don't like each other, some 'warming to each other' moments, and relationships flowering. A train crash (well, stopped by snow anyway) in Gracetown stops one girl from travelling to her grandma's house while her parents are in prison (in a hilarious story of shopping indulgence), the snow threatens to stop another from reaching the restaurant where a whole troop of cheerleaders are anxiously awaiting his Twister board, and another struggles to rescue a teacup pig for a friend. Eccentric, funny, and perfect winter reading.

The characters are well-drawn, some rather adorable ones of both genders, lots of witty banter, loveable relatives and cute set-ups. The trio of tales complement each other and play off each other very well, it's good to see characters again, and from different perspectives as you read along.

None feels so brief as to be incomplete, they all have a good length to them, but they also run into each other enough to feel like one longer story, told by different narrators.

Warm and snug set of YA stories for a winter's evening. Most enjoyable.
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on 2 June 2014
My daughter insisted we buy this book because she loves John Green, however she has told me that she was slightly disappointed with this book. It just wasn't what she anticipated and assumed that it was. She thought that it would be one story put into three different perspectives, however it's not. It's three completely different stories with hints of the other stories in them. My daughter thinks that anyone who obsesses and admires John Green will buy this book however they may let down because of the assumption for what it is, compared to what it actually is. Although the book was nice and light hearted, my daughter said she wishes she had spent her money on something else. However, you may like it! The plot is good and the thought of three short stories for the price of one is nice, but don't get sucked in just because of John Green's name.
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