Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now

Customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
17
4.4 out of 5 stars


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 7 March 2016
Bought in conjunction with the authors hatters, railwaymen and knitters which I reviewed as "quirky" this is the perfect companion. As much about social history, a page turner....
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 June 2017
Brilliant mon the ton
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 June 2017
Well written. Cowdenbeath will mean more to me in the future when I hear their result.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 27 January 2011
What a fantastic little book this is. If you've grown tired of the commercialisation of football, much like the author clearly has, then this is the book for you. Dan takes a chapter each to take in a lower league game combining each chapter not only with a review of the game but also a bit of history about the place and a nice wee social commentary on the personalities in the crowd.

An utterly fantastic review with just the right level of football and whimsy. On top of this, it also poses some interesting questions regarding the future of Scottish football such as how do lower league teams counter the fact that many of their potential fan base leave their town each Saturday to go watch the Old Firm play.

Great read, highly recommended.
0Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 28 December 2010
Being one of the small percentage of the population who doesn't profess to like (or, really, understand) football at any level, I thought this might be a challenging read. My one attempt at travel off the beaten track in Scotland also ended in defeat, in the form of being refused service in a corner shop & eventually abandoning a miserably damp caravan holiday in the Highlands.

So I was surprised to find myself hypnotised by this book, to the extent that I devoured it in less than a week. Not only does Gray manage to describe on-pitch action in an involving and frequently hilarious fashion, but his adventures off the pitch are informative, heartwarming, affectionate and (again) deeply amusing. The author resists the traditional English urge to point at the Scots and mock their love of disgusting beverages, lank-haired comics and vacillation between radical politics and opiated myopia; instead, this book is a brilliant exploration of small town Scotland's rich and fascinating history, and how the non-Old Firm football teams have both reflected and influenced this.

If you are in any way interested in football, Scotland, history, left-wing politics or just amusing tales about ketchup delivered in a high-pitched Scottish accent, this will be an informative and enjoyable read.
0Comment| 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 November 2011
A view of Scottish football from the other side. Ignoring the overwhelming and smothering influence that the premier league has on the game, this goes where most dare not tread, where you can stand on the touchline and see football at its best. This is a look at local teams playing with passion and spirit and the communities they represent.
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 1 August 2013
Thoroughly enjoyable with lots of "laugh out loud" moments - this should be a must read for all aspiring football fans (and all fans who shy away from the glory hunters of the various Premier leagues). In anticipation of a family trip to visit as many small town Scottish football matches as we can in a week, my son gave me this book as a birthday present. It was a thoroughly enjoyable read and, without repeating much of what has been said in other reviews, it really is a very good blend of all things Scottish (apart from grouse shooting and highland flings) and is well worth a read. If you like Ian Rankin and John Rebus (both feature in the book) and supporting the underdog, then this book is just for you.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 January 2011
I loved this book. What surprised me is it's not really about football, but the people and communities that are bound by a shared passion.
11 Comment| 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 August 2011
A fascinating and rewarding read which is as much a travelogue and about social history as it is about football. You can visit, with the author, towns and places famous for their football teams eg Ayr, Greenock and Cumbernauld. This book recognises the damage done to local support by the emphasis placed on the 'Old Firm', and shows that there is another side to Scottish Football.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 24 November 2016
There aren't too many books focusing on the lower divisions of Scottish football, so when I saw this I decided to give it a go. The writing is easy to follow though at time I think he tries to be a little too funny without pulling it off. The chapters are basically split into two sections; the town and the football team visited. Although there are some very interesting facts about the teams, I actually found the history of the towns to be more fascinating, which I suppose could open it up to those who would like to learn about Scotland's 'forgotten' towns. My personal favourite is the Cowdenbeath chapter.

For those of us who have visited these places supporting our diddy team, its fun to recognise pubs and descriptions of the grounds. For those new to the delights of lower league Scottish football, it's a nice little introduction to the charm of it all.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)