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4.5 out of 5 stars
64
4.5 out of 5 stars
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on 25 May 2002
I was sixteen when I first read this book, which turned out to be the sequel to another - the Weirdstone of Brisingamen - which I later read to see what I had missed.
This is the most haunting, lyrical and beautiful of children's novels. The subject matter is deeply influenced by Celtic mythology, but by introducing it into a modern setting the story gains a resonance and power that is often missing from the 'strange tale in a strange land' fantasy commonplace.
One of the best children's novels ever written.
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on 17 September 2017
I first read the Weirdstone of Brisingamen at school, now an author myself I recently purchased the second book featuring Colin and Susan. While the Weirdstone was a total thrill and a there and back again story, blending the disharmony as two worlds clashed, the Moon of Gomrath is a disappointment. It is true that it captures some of that disharmony but it crashes and burns when the writer allows his research to show and forgets to tell a story. Up to the last chapter I would have given the story 4 Stars, but it ends so abruptly that it makes you wonder what happened to the last chapter. I looked for it but could not find it. So we are left completely in the dark.
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on 31 August 2017
I read this years ago when I had young children and rebought fit on a whim. I am so glad I did as I had remembered it as a marvellous book and it is as I remembered it! Children and adults who enjoyed Harry Potter would do well to explore the worlds created before as they are just as good!
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on 2 May 2017
Excellent sequel to "Weirdstone" maintains the imagery and magic.
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on 20 April 2017
As described thanks
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on 22 June 2000
When I was at school, our art teacher used to read us a chapter of this per lesson - halfway though the book I found I was unable to wait a week for the resolution to a particularly cliff-hanging chapter, and dragged my mother to the shops to buy the book for myself. Even as an adult, this is one of my favourite books. Living within easy reach of Alderley Edge is a bonus. I heartily recommend any of Alan Garner's books to anyone.
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on 31 July 2017
As fabulous as I remembered it to be.
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on 14 August 2007
Amazon claims that this CD is for 4-8 year olds. It is not. The Moon of Gomrath, and its predecessor The Wierdstone of Brisinghamen, are probably best suited to 10-14 year olds. I first read them 30 years ago and the darkness of them still lurks in the corners of my memory. They are powerful, well-crafted books that hang in the mind but they are definitely not for 4 year olds even if they don't have to read it themselves.
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on 10 July 2009
The Moon of Gomrath by Alan Garner is the second of "The Alderley Tales". The first of which I have also reviewed.

"Moon" was first published in 1963 and is still in print today. That alone would be testament to its strength - before print on demand came along books generally went out of print pretty quickly due to the cost of print runs.

However "Moon" is not quite as strong a book as it's predecessor - but given the strength of "Weirdstone" that would be a struggle. Taken on it's own merits, however, it is a very strong book.

Colin and Susan - the protagonists from "Weirdstone" - are drawn back into the otherworld and the ancient struggle between good and evil when they accidentally rouse the Old Magic, and thus the Wild Hunt, from its slumber. As enemies and allies from the previous book return and new ones appear only the children's courage will enable them to survive the ordeal - and if they don't it's likely the world won't either.

There is a depth to Garner's characters that is breathtaking. While the Wizard Cadellin is undeniably good and the Morrigan evil every other character exists somewhere inbetween. Some of the 'good' characters really get my back up - and this is quite intentional.

For example his his elves are prats. They aren't evil, they're creatures of light who fight on the side of good. But they are also arrogant, uncaring and lack empthy for humans. When you learn that they have been forced to flee to the edges of Britain because smoke pollution makes them ill you get the point but you can't help feeling it's not that much loss.

I'm conscious in this review that I don't want to give too much of the plot away, but the ending is a bittersweet thing like the best dark chocolate. There is death and life, sorrow and joy all wrapped up in one package and it works. It works very well.

Where it's weaker than "Weirdstone" is that it all feels more contrived. Some of the dangers and solutions that face Colin and Susan - especially early on - are the result of unfortunately combining events. For example the Elves ask for something Susan has at the same time as something else happens, and Susan ends up in danger from event two only because she's given the thing in question to the Elves. In "Weirdstone" the coincidences felt like the hand of fate guiding things - in "Moon" it's less so - though by the end you wonder, because it does all wrap up well. It's cetainly not a deal breaker.

I gave "Weirdstone" Five Stars. I give "Moon" Four and a Half - listed as four even though I don't usually round down, because I want to make sure it's clear I feel it's slightly weaker.
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on 4 January 2002
It is refreshing to remember that before television had assumed its current unassailable ascendancy, when children still had imaginations, there were great writers creating masterpieces of imagination. This is one of them. It and its older sibling, The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, stand as outposts of true genius in a modern world filled with mediocrity. At 40 years old, it is as current as if it had been written yesterday.
Robert Powell doesn't do a bad job either!
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