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on 28 December 2016
“One cannot be too careful with words, they change their minds just as people do.”

Saramago is in good form in this novel of two halves. The first concerns itself with the societal implications of deaths ceasing to happen. The second half with one individual who, once death starts to occur again, manages to avoid dying, and the personification of death herself.

As usual the actual story is just the bones on which Saramago builds to entertain the reader – and this is a salient point about the author’s writing stance: You are very definitely a reader and the narrator is at pains to fulfil his role and only to keen to point out when he doesn’t.

Saramago’s style is packed with contradictions which make reading his novels so rewarding: for example a complete lack of detail concerning where, when, to whom these events take place, but masses of conjecture about what a dog might have said if its owner would have asked it something. There is soaring prose prising open some truth, followed by dead ends of in logically delivered information. Its brilliant stuff.

“..the fate of hopes is always to breed more hopes, which is why, despite so many disappointments, they have not yet died out in the world..”
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on 29 March 2012
I was sucked into this by the interesting premise of what would happen if, in just one country, everyone stops dying. The book was written in 2005 so this is years before the TV series Torchwood explored a similar idea. The first half of the book followed up the implications of both that premise and then a personified "death" changing their mind and switching to a whole new system of preannounced deaths. However both the character of "death" and the book itself then lose their way falling through whimsy, and sentimental tosh, to an increasingly obvious and dull conclusion.
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on 13 February 2010
I think the idea for this novel was very good- what happens if death decided not to kill anymore? I don't think This brilliant idea was realised to its full potential, I found the book good, but not very good or amazing in any way, I also did not like the ending much. I did not hate it, but felt it could have been alot better- I have just started reading 'blindness' which is a much better written book by saramago and I would definately reccommend reading that one and not this one.
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on 27 April 2013
Death at Intervals is another story with an interesting premise from Portuguese writer and nobel prize winner, jose saramago. the premise: people stop dying. is Death on vacation? the first few chapters are the best but towards the end i got the distinct feeling saramago didn't really know how to wrap up his story. it is still worth a read, but it is in no way on the same league as saramago's earlier works, namely: baltazar and blimunda, blindness, the gospel according to jesus christ, to name just a few.
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on 1 August 2016
The book started out as satirical social comment but ended up as a love story. So it seemed to go off the rails.
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on 16 May 2013
This is the tird book by this author that I have read. This is an easier read than 'Blindness' and 'Seeing' - a slightly different style. All were bought as used books - in very good condition true to description.
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on 3 March 2016
very happy with the service you provide. solid.
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on 8 November 2014
Very strange book and tricky to read without punctuation. Interesting idea.
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on 22 February 2016
A very good read.
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on 2 November 2015
amazing
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