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on 29 August 2013
I read the first one of Peter May's Lewis Trilogy, and was completely hooked right to end of number three. Thought he couldn't top them - but then started the China Thrillers , and felt a real sense of loss when I reached the end of the final one in the series.
So I was really enthused by the thought of beginning another group of novels by one of my favourite writers. Sadly, my enthusiasm fairly soon evaporated. I just couldn't get interested in the characters or places. Perhaps my lack of interest in France as a setting is the main reason that I probably won't read any more of the Enzo Files.
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on 17 October 2013
I thoroughly enjoyed it. Far-fetched maybe, but it doesn't have to be 'real' to be a good read. This is very different from the Lewis Trilogy, but still intelligently written with a real sense of France. I am looking forward to reading more.
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on 22 December 2015
Not quite sure what to make of this - I have read the Lewis series of books from Peter May and really enjoyed the atmospheric writing and descriptions of the islands and the people. This book came as somewhat of a surprise to me in terms of the style of writing. Completely different and you'd be pushed to say it was the same author.

Story itself is OK, although the twists are telegraphed very early - you can spot what is coming a mile off.

What I found somewhat distracting was the fact that the characters are supposed to be speaking in French and yet there is the odd French word thrown in - Peter May lives in France, hence the setting for the book, but the French/English thing was a bit clumsy for me.
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on 16 October 2015
Enzo Macleod has made a bet, to resolve a crime that has been left open by the french police, he will use new forensics, to get blood out of stones.
I loved the character, he is charming and distinctive, with his family and lady complications. The ambiance of Paris and the french idiosyncrasies of privilege and politics, make and excellent scenario for our scottish friend; but I did not enjoy the clue laden crime as much.
An ok beginning to a good series, that improves with the next parts of the next mysteries. Entertaining and charming if a little too heavy on the complexity of the crime.
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on 25 November 2015
Came to this after the Scottish island series with real characters in real setting. This was more Agatha Christie, just a puzzle to solve, totally contrived with no connection with reality at all. Solutions popped up with convenient coincidences at regular intervals. Well written, with a strong narrative drive, but not for me, thanks. I have neither the time nor the inclination to play this sort of literary game. Give me Resnick or Rebus any day.
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on 9 March 2012
Oh dear, having loved the first 2 Lewis Trilogy books, I bought this in the absence of book 3. I really wish I hadn't bothered. While May paints a vivid picture, his characterisation is thin, his plotlines just silly, his sex scenes excruciating and if he really must use so much French he needs to get his publishers to employ decent proof readers/editors. I was incredibly irritated by mis-spellings and inaccurate French :- "ele" for "Ile" in particular because it occurred so often. Frankly I didn't care enough about "whodunnit" or even what they "dun" to finish this book. How can a writer be so inconsistent?
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on 21 November 2015
Having enjoyed the Lewis trilogy, I thought I would try this story set in Paris and Cahors both of which I know well. The principal character (Enzo Macleod) comes across as an irritating middle-aged hippy oblivious to the hurt he has caused to the women in his life until it's too late. The book is very well written but the plot is, frankly, preposterous. And please, Mr May, don't write of food being 'washed down' with wine; it suggests drains rather than a nice meal.
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on 9 October 2014
This one wasn't for me. I found the structure of the story very formulaic and the characters unappealing. Reading it on Kindle meant not being able to flick back through the pages to check who owned the various French names, so I got very confused.
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Having been converted to Peter May fandom by the excellent Lewis Trilogy, which was only enhanced by Entry Island, I was slightly apprehensive about trying out Enzo Macleod for size. The reason being that my foray into ‘extra-Lewis’ territory hadn’t been a happy one after being thoroughly disappointed by the first in the China Series, The Firemaker. Admittedly, I didn’t finish it and may go back to it in due course: the culture clash ‘lost in translation’ nature of the narrative seemed a bit forced; lacking the verisimilitude that made the Lewis books so ‘real’.

Luckily, my experience this time round was a pleasant one. We have a middle-aged ‘grumpy old man’ as protagonist: Enzo Macleod, Professor of Biology at a ‘second rank’ French University, a somewhat embittered and battered victim of life’s vicissitudes, which have left him with no wives and two adult daughters, one doting, one not so. He takes on a bet to solve one of the country’s most baffling mysteries; the disappearance of one of its rising young stars, ten years previously. What follows is a kind of Anneka Rice type ‘Treasure Hunt’ around France hunting down clues to the whereabouts of the missing person.

It’s all a bit preposterous but thoroughly entertaining for all that and I’m now looking forward to the second instalment of Enzo’s adventures: I might even give the Firemaker another go!
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on 29 April 2012
I'd never heard of Peter May before his Lewis series, but as I got through the Lewis Man in a weekend, I had a look for more books by him and came across the Enzo Files series. I have to admit that I started with these rather than any of his other books partly because it cost 72p, so there was little risk involved and partly because Kindle had the first book and I could start from the beginning.

Although the reviews hadn't been all that encouraging, this book engaged me from the start. It is character driven rather than procedural, i.e. it doesn't get into the science that much. Just enough to explain the conclusions.

It is true that some of the characters could be fleshed out more but there was enough about each character for me to understand their motivations and behaviour.

When I finished this book I immediately downloaded the next one in the series.
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