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on 2 November 2014
Excellent memoir of a time that most people cannot even imagine, or would want to imagine. Working so hard, in such a brutal way on little food must have been a nightmare. God help them when they became unwell or injured.

I always enjoy autobiographies/biographies. Peoples strength in the face of appalling adversity fills me with admiration for them.
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on 1 September 2014
An outstanding and moving book, how these men had the courage and the determination to go on day by day is a shining example to the human spirit.
I could never say l enjoyed reading the book as as that would be saying l enjoyed reading about the men's suffering
All l can ask myself is 'How would l have coped if l had been one of the captives
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on 9 August 2014
This book made me cry, how can some Countrys be so callous, I must admit I had a cry, the
japs were breaking the Geneva convention but was they put on trial I bet they wasn't.I am surprised that all of the prisoners did not die. The title says it all reading about it was enough for me. Rest in peace you brave ones, and thank you for our lives.
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on 28 August 2014
This is a very good read giving a detailed account of the man's time in the Far East. Very readable from the outset it describes the time from before capture to liberation in considerable detail giving a very good insight into how they survived the ordeal. Highly recommended and as one other revirewer said, it is much, much better than The Railway Man.
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on 5 November 2014
Railway of hell, heart rendering story on map captivity.. I had a friend in Zambia, Charlie Bush who was a Japanese prisoner of war. He was taken to Japan proper work in in the coal mines in which Japanese woman had to work alongside them in appalling conditions...
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on 18 November 2014
It was an interesting story and I expect that I would hang on every word that LtCol spoke to me face to face but I got the impression that this was still a work which had been restricted rather than the true account of what happened.
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on 19 February 2015
Still reading through, my late uncle was in Changi but he never spoke about it,I now understand why. However it is a book, along with many others that should be introduced into schools so the youngster may read about the hero's of our time.
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on 10 July 2014
excellent book the reader can almost feel the pain he endured, the conditions the prisoners existed in was horrific, there is a film of this book and I will go to see it, but know it will be hard to see what I have read I recommend this book without compulsion worth the 5 star I gave
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on 25 February 2015
I had read the previous version many years ago "The road to Three Pagodas". this is an updated version by the author but it is difficult to know what is new in the book, hence 4stars. As in the original, Lt Col Reginald Burton has made the book a fascinating read, describing the conditions many POWs suffered. Without dwelling in horrific detail, he writes about the violent abuse, lack of food, clothing & medicine, with anecdotes of brave men somehow retaining a sense of humour, maintaining morale and ethic of right & wrong.
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on 26 August 2014
We'll written book, first book I have read on Japanese captivity that mentions decent guards and reasonably humane treatment.
Still a harrowing experience and we must never forget the brutality and deprivation that these men suffered.
Graham Whitfield
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