Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop Women's Shop Men's

Customer reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
20
4.8 out of 5 stars
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:£9.74+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 28 March 2017
Brilliant! Ice House consistently good - just as I remember them (no duff tracks, unlike with some CDs).
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
"Primitive Man" by ICEHOUSE was originally released in 1982 in the USA and Australia. Confusion arises because it was re-issued in the UK in 1983 as "Love In Motion" with a different track list and different front cover. Luckily this 2002 Expanded CD Remaster (supervised by the band’s founder and principal songwriter IVA DAVIES) takes that into account. Here are the Great Southern details…

UK released October 2002 - "Primitive Man" by ICEHOUSE on Warner Brothers Remasters 0927489822 (Barcode 9325583016424) is an Expanded CD Remaster and is based on the USA issue of the LP. The 11 tracks spread across both of the UK and US LP variants are all on this 17-track CD and with programming will allow fans to line up either LP as follows …

The original USA and Australian 1982 LP "Primitive Land" tracks were:
Side 1:
1. Great Southern Land [1]
2. Uniform [2]
3. Hey Little Girl [3]
4. Street Cafe [4]
5. Glam [5]
Side 2:
1. Trojan Blue [6]
2. One By One [7]
3. Break These Chains [8]
4. Mysterious Thing [9]
5. Goodnight Mr. Matthews [10]

The 1983 UK LP "Love In Motion" tracks were:
Side 1:
1. Uniform [2]
2. Street Cafe [4]
3. Hey Little Girl [3]
4. Glam [5]
5. Great Southern Land [1]
Side 2:
1. Trojan Blue [6]
2. Love In Motion [15]
3. Mysterious Thing [9]
4. One By One [7]
5. Goodnight, Mr. Matthews [10]

The other 6 Bonus Tracks are:
11. Over The Line
12. Glam (12" Version)
13. Uniform (12" German Version)
14. Street Cafe (Single Mix)
15. Love In Motion (US Recording)
16. Can't Help Myself (Live)
17. We Can Get Together (Live)

The bonus tracks mostly gather up rare 12" single B-sides - like the German sung version of "Uniform" which is incredibly difficult to find on original vinyl - so they're all welcome inclusions here.

I bought these albums in the 80's and loved their sound then - and still do - a sort of Australian Cars meets Roxy Music meets Talk Talk meets Spandau meets Thomas Dolby meets Prefab Sprout meets...well you get the idea. Icehouse' sound is I suppose closest to the hypnotic and superb synth melody of "Heartbeat City" by The Cars. It hasn't dated either like some of the dire 80's productions.

They were re-issued in the USA at the very beginning of CD re-issuing (about 1987 and 88) and they were better than the vinyl versions then, but only ok soundwise - as most of those early CDs were. These new IVA DAVIES (principal songwriter in the band) remastered versions from 2002 are fabulous - superb sounding - and stacked with bonus tracks that will thrill fans. There's little hiss on the tracks, he's not cranked the treble for effect - in fact, they're just muscular in their sound - really great.

"Great Southern Land", "Street Cafe", the groove of the funky instrumental "Glam" - all are ripe for rediscovery.

Of their other albums - I heartily recommend the superb "Sidewalk" from 1984 where they seemed to hit their stride and "Measure For Measure" with the stunning "No Promises" from 1986. "Man Of Colours" too from 1987 is another peach - the 2002 reissue contains the 2 bonus 12" mixes of "Crazy" that were on initial releases of the CD + 5 more bonus tracks.

ICEHOUSE is held in great affection - and on rehearing these albums again - in this glorious sound quality - it's easy to see why. Great band - superb sounding re-issues with fan-pleasing extras. Way to go guys…
0Comment| 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 16 February 2004
Icehouse produced four brilliant albums in the 1980's and this is the first one. It marked a two-fold change for the band in that they changed from Flowers to Icehouse, and that lead singer Iva Davies essentially took control of the band, playing most of the instruments here. Although later Icehouse albums would have a distinctly 80's sound this one manages to sound quite unique - it's use of keyboards sounding far ahead of its time. Standout tracks are the singles Street Cafe, Love In Motion and Hey Little Girl (one of the few Icehouse tracks to chart in the UK). My favourite track is Great Southern Land, it's a song that makes me think of Australia, its sunny weather and lust for life.
0Comment| 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
"Primitive Man" by ICEHOUSE was originally released in 1982 in the USA and Australia. Confusion arises because it was re-issued in the UK in 1983 as "Love In Motion" with a different track list and different front cover. Luckily this 2002 Expanded CD Remaster (supervised by the band’s founder and principal songwriter IVA DAVIES) takes that into account. Here are the Great Southern details…

UK released October 2002 - "Primitive Man" by ICEHOUSE on Warner Brothers Remasters 0927489822 (Barcode 9325583016424) is an Expanded CD Remaster and is based on the USA issue of the LP. The 11 tracks spread across both of the UK and US LP variants are all on this 17-track CD and with programming will allow fans to line up either LP as follows …

The original USA and Australian 1982 LP "Primitive Land" tracks were:
Side 1:
1. Great Southern Land [1]
2. Uniform [2]
3. Hey Little Girl [3]
4. Street Cafe [4]
5. Glam [5]
Side 2:
1. Trojan Blue [6]
2. One By One [7]
3. Break These Chains [8]
4. Mysterious Thing [9]
5. Goodnight Mr. Matthews [10]

The 1983 UK LP "Love In Motion" tracks were:
Side 1:
1. Uniform [2]
2. Street Cafe [4]
3. Hey Little Girl [3]
4. Glam [5]
5. Great Southern Land [1]
Side 2:
1. Trojan Blue [6]
2. Love In Motion [15]
3. Mysterious Thing [9]
4. One By One [7]
5. Goodnight, Mr. Matthews [10]

The other 6 Bonus Tracks are:
11. Over The Line
12. Glam (12" Version)
13. Uniform (12" German Version)
14. Street Cafe (Single Mix)
15. Love In Motion (US Recording)
16. Can't Help Myself (Live)
17. We Can Get Together (Live)

The bonus tracks mostly gather up rare 12" single B-sides - like the German sung version of "Uniform" which is incredibly difficult to find on original vinyl - so they're all welcome inclusions here.

I bought these albums in the 80's and loved their sound then - and still do - a sort of Australian Cars meets Roxy Music meets Talk Talk meets Spandau meets Thomas Dolby meets Prefab Sprout meets...well you get the idea. Icehouse' sound is I suppose closest to the hypnotic and superb synth melody of "Heartbeat City" by The Cars. It hasn't dated either like some of the dire 80's productions.

They were re-issued in the USA at the very beginning of CD re-issuing (about 1987 and 88) and they were better than the vinyl versions then, but only ok soundwise - as most of those early CDs were. These new IVA DAVIES (principal songwriter in the band) remastered versions from 2002 are fabulous - superb sounding - and stacked with bonus tracks that will thrill fans. There's little hiss on the tracks, he's not cranked the treble for effect - in fact, they're just muscular in their sound - really great.

"Great Southern Land", "Street Cafe", the groove of the funky instrumental "Glam" - all are ripe for rediscovery.

Of their other albums - I heartily recommend the superb "Sidewalk" from 1984 where they seemed to hit their stride and "Measure For Measure" with the stunning "No Promises" from 1986. "Man Of Colours" too from 1987 is another peach - the 2002 reissue contains the 2 bonus 12" mixes of "Crazy" that were on initial releases of the CD + 5 more bonus tracks.

ICEHOUSE is held in great affection - and on rehearing these albums again - in this glorious sound quality - it's easy to see why. Great band - superb sounding re-issues with fan-pleasing extras. Way to go guys…
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 6 September 2007
I remember having this album on tape when I was at secondary school. Back then (circa 1986/7), this album was called 'Love In Motion' here in the UK, and not 'Primitive Man'. Like the re released/remastered debut album, the track running order is different from the original UK release, and the absence of the song 'Love In Motion' is notable.
What hasn't changed is the quality of the songs on offer. I speak with the bias of someone who rolls back the years while listening to this music, but I challenge anyone not to fall in love with the songs on this record.
'Uniform', 'Trojan Blue','Goodnight Mr. Matthews' and the quite brilliant 'Great Southern Land' are big, more involving showstoppers (by 80s pop/rock standards), while 'Street Cafe', 'Mysterious Thing' and hit single 'Hey Little Girl', are more radio friendly efforts. There's even an instrumental track, 'Glam'.
Musically, by 1982/3, Icehouse were moving away from the clear influence of The Cars, and were instead cutting their own groove. Having said that, Iva Davies still sounds more like David Bowie, than David Bowie, and out Bryan Ferrys Bryan Ferry at times.
It's a mixed bag of top, top, tracks and I'm thrilled that the passage of time hasn't affected my love of these songs, or this band while I've been revisiting their records.
Absolutely essential stuff.
0Comment| 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 4 October 2000
At a very impressionable age I first heard 'Hey Little Girl', I had never been in love or fully understood the turmoil of love that affects us all as we grow older and discover the world around us. However I fortunately went out and bought a cassette of 'Love In Motion' which was the title used for 'Primitive Man' in the UK at that time.
I listened intently and enjoyed what I heard. The album opens with 'Uniform' a kind of attack on the regimentation of certain styles of life or careers. Then comes the beautiful 'Street Cafe' (a slightly crisper version on this CD with stronger piano) which is meloncholy and calming. (A personal favourite).
'Hey Little Girl' is the track that non fans will know and needs no review.
The rest of the tracks are great. Amazingly, virtually unknown in the UK, 'Great Southern Land' is an absolute classic being a theme song for Oz with a kind of history lesson running through it.
'Trojan Blue' starts beautifully and winds up to a smooth love song.
Iva Davies has said that he was going through relationship sadness during the writing of this album and it is seen all the way from start to finish. He is an accomplished singer / songwriter and musician and was credited for a large percentage of the music on 'Primitive Man'.
I think to enjoy this album you need to have experienced a certain kind of sadness but you must also have a outlook of hope.
During the early eighties when the 'story video' was in vogue (sadly not any longer just synchronised dancing...yawn) one guy seemed to be behind so many classics. Russell Mulcahy directed the videos for Hey Little Girl and Street Cafe and they must rank as two of the best. You should still be able to get the 'Great Southern Land' video on Oz import (PAL works on PAL UK - NOT NTSC!)
I could not possibly say how many times I have listened to this album. It would be in my top ten without question.
If you like it get 'Man Of Colours'...
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
The tracks on Icehouse's first album, run more akin to a Greatest Hits compilation than a debut, so accomplished, polished and commercial is it.

'Hey Little Girl', reaching no. 17 in the U,K., was and still is, one of the greatest synth-pop songs of the early 80's, a lovely little number that has complex chords and percussive rhythms with smatterings of guitar and great vocals by singer Iva Davies. The song uses subtly and superbly the emerging electronic Linn drums and the whole album used the then latest synthesizer technology, thoughtfully and tastefully complementing the songs and not swamping them.

The first hit on their native soil from Primitive Man was 'Great Southern Land' and is the first track, neatly followed by another strong one, 'Uniform'. The dreamy, 'Hey Little Girl' is followed by another single, 'Street Cafe', and then the only track that shouldn't be on the album, the pointless instrumental 'Glam'.

Possibly my favourite, certainly up there with Hey Little Girl, is the lovely, ascending and soaring 'Trojan Blue', which has some great vocals and twangy guitar work. 'One By One' doesn't do much for me, but is OK, then the more rocky 'Break These Chains'. 'Mysterious Thing' is a rhythmic ditty, sounding a bit different to the others but still rolls along nicely, which actually got up to no. 83 as a single in the U.K.

The final but one song of note, before the 12" versions and bonus tracks that appeared on CD from 2002 onwards, is the (again) gorgeous 'Goodnight Mr Matthews', with angelic synths floating around and above another dreamy song with a strong, tuneful chorus. Lastly, 'Over the Line' sounds very much like Talk Talk at their best.

Primitive Man remains a seminal album for those who like that sort of clever, well-written and produced pop that while sounds a bit 80s-ish, hasn't dated anywhere as much as much as many of its rivals and so for us Icehouse fans, remains a timeless classic.
0Comment| One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 March 2016
I should have gotten my own copy years ago. With the acquisition of this album I risk being accused of bending one of my sternest rules, that being "Nothing depressing and/or downbeat because the world already holds enough of that sort of thing". Yet I think I remain within the line and the spirit of my unashamedly simplistic philosophy .
Most of what I would wish to say has already been said more than eloquently by other reviewers, and I agree with none more than Amidar when saying "I think to enjoy this album you need to have experienced a certain kind of sadness but you must also have a outlook of hope.". But having said that, it must be stressed that there is no over-sentimentality here. There is sadness and loss but they don't have centre stage. Amid the scenery of melancholy and confusion you will encounter the main players Consolation, Defiance and Resolution. You'll not meet despair.
If you need to "rise above" I rate this for some heavy lifting.
Listen to it with those whom you "let in", on your own when doing something creative or simply when introspection takes you. It's excellent company.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 14 July 2007
Takes me back to my younger days! This superb album really does Icehouse justice, a must have for all music lovers.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 12 July 2011
Holy @:£$!

This is just amazing!!!

This is, put simply, one of the greatest pop records ever produced. From the haunting openings of 'Great Southern Land' to the final bar of the last track, Iva Davies proves his mettle as a legendary songwriter. As for 'Street Cafe' - pure class.

I am so annoyed to discover it's not even available at the moment.

I've had the original CD for years but truth is it ended up collecting dust on a rarely visited shelf. Anyway, I picked up this remastered/extra tracks CD a couple of weeks ago when I saw it listed on a certain auction website.

Crikey! What can I say ... I can say this: if there was any justice in the world Icehouse would be as big as U2 or Simple Minds et al.
0Comment|Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)